Merge branch 'master' into divVerent/crypto2
[xonotic/xonotic.git] / misc / builddeps / dp.linux32 / share / info / gmp.info-2
1 This is ../../gmp/doc/gmp.info, produced by makeinfo version 4.8 from
2 ../../gmp/doc/gmp.texi.
3
4    This manual describes how to install and use the GNU multiple
5 precision arithmetic library, version 5.0.1.
6
7    Copyright 1991, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000,
8 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010 Free
9 Software Foundation, Inc.
10
11    Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this
12 document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version
13 1.3 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation;
14 with no Invariant Sections, with the Front-Cover Texts being "A GNU
15 Manual", and with the Back-Cover Texts being "You have freedom to copy
16 and modify this GNU Manual, like GNU software".  A copy of the license
17 is included in *Note GNU Free Documentation License::.
18
19 INFO-DIR-SECTION GNU libraries
20 START-INFO-DIR-ENTRY
21 * gmp: (gmp).                   GNU Multiple Precision Arithmetic Library.
22 END-INFO-DIR-ENTRY
23
24 \1f
25 File: gmp.info,  Node: Powering Algorithms,  Next: Root Extraction Algorithms,  Prev: Greatest Common Divisor Algorithms,  Up: Algorithms
26
27 16.4 Powering Algorithms
28 ========================
29
30 * Menu:
31
32 * Normal Powering Algorithm::
33 * Modular Powering Algorithm::
34
35 \1f
36 File: gmp.info,  Node: Normal Powering Algorithm,  Next: Modular Powering Algorithm,  Prev: Powering Algorithms,  Up: Powering Algorithms
37
38 16.4.1 Normal Powering
39 ----------------------
40
41 Normal `mpz' or `mpf' powering uses a simple binary algorithm,
42 successively squaring and then multiplying by the base when a 1 bit is
43 seen in the exponent, as per Knuth section 4.6.3.  The "left to right"
44 variant described there is used rather than algorithm A, since it's
45 just as easy and can be done with somewhat less temporary memory.
46
47 \1f
48 File: gmp.info,  Node: Modular Powering Algorithm,  Prev: Normal Powering Algorithm,  Up: Powering Algorithms
49
50 16.4.2 Modular Powering
51 -----------------------
52
53 Modular powering is implemented using a 2^k-ary sliding window
54 algorithm, as per "Handbook of Applied Cryptography" algorithm 14.85
55 (*note References::).  k is chosen according to the size of the
56 exponent.  Larger exponents use larger values of k, the choice being
57 made to minimize the average number of multiplications that must
58 supplement the squaring.
59
60    The modular multiplies and squares use either a simple division or
61 the REDC method by Montgomery (*note References::).  REDC is a little
62 faster, essentially saving N single limb divisions in a fashion similar
63 to an exact remainder (*note Exact Remainder::).
64
65 \1f
66 File: gmp.info,  Node: Root Extraction Algorithms,  Next: Radix Conversion Algorithms,  Prev: Powering Algorithms,  Up: Algorithms
67
68 16.5 Root Extraction Algorithms
69 ===============================
70
71 * Menu:
72
73 * Square Root Algorithm::
74 * Nth Root Algorithm::
75 * Perfect Square Algorithm::
76 * Perfect Power Algorithm::
77
78 \1f
79 File: gmp.info,  Node: Square Root Algorithm,  Next: Nth Root Algorithm,  Prev: Root Extraction Algorithms,  Up: Root Extraction Algorithms
80
81 16.5.1 Square Root
82 ------------------
83
84 Square roots are taken using the "Karatsuba Square Root" algorithm by
85 Paul Zimmermann (*note References::).
86
87    An input n is split into four parts of k bits each, so with b=2^k we
88 have n = a3*b^3 + a2*b^2 + a1*b + a0.  Part a3 must be "normalized" so
89 that either the high or second highest bit is set.  In GMP, k is kept
90 on a limb boundary and the input is left shifted (by an even number of
91 bits) to normalize.
92
93    The square root of the high two parts is taken, by recursive
94 application of the algorithm (bottoming out in a one-limb Newton's
95 method),
96
97      s1,r1 = sqrtrem (a3*b + a2)
98
99    This is an approximation to the desired root and is extended by a
100 division to give s,r,
101
102      q,u = divrem (r1*b + a1, 2*s1)
103      s = s1*b + q
104      r = u*b + a0 - q^2
105
106    The normalization requirement on a3 means at this point s is either
107 correct or 1 too big.  r is negative in the latter case, so
108
109      if r < 0 then
110        r = r + 2*s - 1
111        s = s - 1
112
113    The algorithm is expressed in a divide and conquer form, but as
114 noted in the paper it can also be viewed as a discrete variant of
115 Newton's method, or as a variation on the schoolboy method (no longer
116 taught) for square roots two digits at a time.
117
118    If the remainder r is not required then usually only a few high limbs
119 of r and u need to be calculated to determine whether an adjustment to
120 s is required.  This optimization is not currently implemented.
121
122    In the Karatsuba multiplication range this algorithm is
123 O(1.5*M(N/2)), where M(n) is the time to multiply two numbers of n
124 limbs.  In the FFT multiplication range this grows to a bound of
125 O(6*M(N/2)).  In practice a factor of about 1.5 to 1.8 is found in the
126 Karatsuba and Toom-3 ranges, growing to 2 or 3 in the FFT range.
127
128    The algorithm does all its calculations in integers and the resulting
129 `mpn_sqrtrem' is used for both `mpz_sqrt' and `mpf_sqrt'.  The extended
130 precision given by `mpf_sqrt_ui' is obtained by padding with zero limbs.
131
132 \1f
133 File: gmp.info,  Node: Nth Root Algorithm,  Next: Perfect Square Algorithm,  Prev: Square Root Algorithm,  Up: Root Extraction Algorithms
134
135 16.5.2 Nth Root
136 ---------------
137
138 Integer Nth roots are taken using Newton's method with the following
139 iteration, where A is the input and n is the root to be taken.
140
141               1         A
142      a[i+1] = - * ( --------- + (n-1)*a[i] )
143               n     a[i]^(n-1)
144
145    The initial approximation a[1] is generated bitwise by successively
146 powering a trial root with or without new 1 bits, aiming to be just
147 above the true root.  The iteration converges quadratically when
148 started from a good approximation.  When n is large more initial bits
149 are needed to get good convergence.  The current implementation is not
150 particularly well optimized.
151
152 \1f
153 File: gmp.info,  Node: Perfect Square Algorithm,  Next: Perfect Power Algorithm,  Prev: Nth Root Algorithm,  Up: Root Extraction Algorithms
154
155 16.5.3 Perfect Square
156 ---------------------
157
158 A significant fraction of non-squares can be quickly identified by
159 checking whether the input is a quadratic residue modulo small integers.
160
161    `mpz_perfect_square_p' first tests the input mod 256, which means
162 just examining the low byte.  Only 44 different values occur for
163 squares mod 256, so 82.8% of inputs can be immediately identified as
164 non-squares.
165
166    On a 32-bit system similar tests are done mod 9, 5, 7, 13 and 17,
167 for a total 99.25% of inputs identified as non-squares.  On a 64-bit
168 system 97 is tested too, for a total 99.62%.
169
170    These moduli are chosen because they're factors of 2^24-1 (or 2^48-1
171 for 64-bits), and such a remainder can be quickly taken just using
172 additions (see `mpn_mod_34lsub1').
173
174    When nails are in use moduli are instead selected by the `gen-psqr.c'
175 program and applied with an `mpn_mod_1'.  The same 2^24-1 or 2^48-1
176 could be done with nails using some extra bit shifts, but this is not
177 currently implemented.
178
179    In any case each modulus is applied to the `mpn_mod_34lsub1' or
180 `mpn_mod_1' remainder and a table lookup identifies non-squares.  By
181 using a "modexact" style calculation, and suitably permuted tables,
182 just one multiply each is required, see the code for details.  Moduli
183 are also combined to save operations, so long as the lookup tables
184 don't become too big.  `gen-psqr.c' does all the pre-calculations.
185
186    A square root must still be taken for any value that passes these
187 tests, to verify it's really a square and not one of the small fraction
188 of non-squares that get through (ie. a pseudo-square to all the tested
189 bases).
190
191    Clearly more residue tests could be done, `mpz_perfect_square_p' only
192 uses a compact and efficient set.  Big inputs would probably benefit
193 from more residue testing, small inputs might be better off with less.
194 The assumed distribution of squares versus non-squares in the input
195 would affect such considerations.
196
197 \1f
198 File: gmp.info,  Node: Perfect Power Algorithm,  Prev: Perfect Square Algorithm,  Up: Root Extraction Algorithms
199
200 16.5.4 Perfect Power
201 --------------------
202
203 Detecting perfect powers is required by some factorization algorithms.
204 Currently `mpz_perfect_power_p' is implemented using repeated Nth root
205 extractions, though naturally only prime roots need to be considered.
206 (*Note Nth Root Algorithm::.)
207
208    If a prime divisor p with multiplicity e can be found, then only
209 roots which are divisors of e need to be considered, much reducing the
210 work necessary.  To this end divisibility by a set of small primes is
211 checked.
212
213 \1f
214 File: gmp.info,  Node: Radix Conversion Algorithms,  Next: Other Algorithms,  Prev: Root Extraction Algorithms,  Up: Algorithms
215
216 16.6 Radix Conversion
217 =====================
218
219 Radix conversions are less important than other algorithms.  A program
220 dominated by conversions should probably use a different data
221 representation.
222
223 * Menu:
224
225 * Binary to Radix::
226 * Radix to Binary::
227
228 \1f
229 File: gmp.info,  Node: Binary to Radix,  Next: Radix to Binary,  Prev: Radix Conversion Algorithms,  Up: Radix Conversion Algorithms
230
231 16.6.1 Binary to Radix
232 ----------------------
233
234 Conversions from binary to a power-of-2 radix use a simple and fast
235 O(N) bit extraction algorithm.
236
237    Conversions from binary to other radices use one of two algorithms.
238 Sizes below `GET_STR_PRECOMPUTE_THRESHOLD' use a basic O(N^2) method.
239 Repeated divisions by b^n are made, where b is the radix and n is the
240 biggest power that fits in a limb.  But instead of simply using the
241 remainder r from such divisions, an extra divide step is done to give a
242 fractional limb representing r/b^n.  The digits of r can then be
243 extracted using multiplications by b rather than divisions.  Special
244 case code is provided for decimal, allowing multiplications by 10 to
245 optimize to shifts and adds.
246
247    Above `GET_STR_PRECOMPUTE_THRESHOLD' a sub-quadratic algorithm is
248 used.  For an input t, powers b^(n*2^i) of the radix are calculated,
249 until a power between t and sqrt(t) is reached.  t is then divided by
250 that largest power, giving a quotient which is the digits above that
251 power, and a remainder which is those below.  These two parts are in
252 turn divided by the second highest power, and so on recursively.  When
253 a piece has been divided down to less than `GET_STR_DC_THRESHOLD'
254 limbs, the basecase algorithm described above is used.
255
256    The advantage of this algorithm is that big divisions can make use
257 of the sub-quadratic divide and conquer division (*note Divide and
258 Conquer Division::), and big divisions tend to have less overheads than
259 lots of separate single limb divisions anyway.  But in any case the
260 cost of calculating the powers b^(n*2^i) must first be overcome.
261
262    `GET_STR_PRECOMPUTE_THRESHOLD' and `GET_STR_DC_THRESHOLD' represent
263 the same basic thing, the point where it becomes worth doing a big
264 division to cut the input in half.  `GET_STR_PRECOMPUTE_THRESHOLD'
265 includes the cost of calculating the radix power required, whereas
266 `GET_STR_DC_THRESHOLD' assumes that's already available, which is the
267 case when recursing.
268
269    Since the base case produces digits from least to most significant
270 but they want to be stored from most to least, it's necessary to
271 calculate in advance how many digits there will be, or at least be sure
272 not to underestimate that.  For GMP the number of input bits is
273 multiplied by `chars_per_bit_exactly' from `mp_bases', rounding up.
274 The result is either correct or one too big.
275
276    Examining some of the high bits of the input could increase the
277 chance of getting the exact number of digits, but an exact result every
278 time would not be practical, since in general the difference between
279 numbers 100... and 99... is only in the last few bits and the work to
280 identify 99...  might well be almost as much as a full conversion.
281
282    `mpf_get_str' doesn't currently use the algorithm described here, it
283 multiplies or divides by a power of b to move the radix point to the
284 just above the highest non-zero digit (or at worst one above that
285 location), then multiplies by b^n to bring out digits.  This is O(N^2)
286 and is certainly not optimal.
287
288    The r/b^n scheme described above for using multiplications to bring
289 out digits might be useful for more than a single limb.  Some brief
290 experiments with it on the base case when recursing didn't give a
291 noticeable improvement, but perhaps that was only due to the
292 implementation.  Something similar would work for the sub-quadratic
293 divisions too, though there would be the cost of calculating a bigger
294 radix power.
295
296    Another possible improvement for the sub-quadratic part would be to
297 arrange for radix powers that balanced the sizes of quotient and
298 remainder produced, ie. the highest power would be an b^(n*k)
299 approximately equal to sqrt(t), not restricted to a 2^i factor.  That
300 ought to smooth out a graph of times against sizes, but may or may not
301 be a net speedup.
302
303 \1f
304 File: gmp.info,  Node: Radix to Binary,  Prev: Binary to Radix,  Up: Radix Conversion Algorithms
305
306 16.6.2 Radix to Binary
307 ----------------------
308
309 *This section needs to be rewritten, it currently describes the
310 algorithms used before GMP 4.3.*
311
312    Conversions from a power-of-2 radix into binary use a simple and fast
313 O(N) bitwise concatenation algorithm.
314
315    Conversions from other radices use one of two algorithms.  Sizes
316 below `SET_STR_PRECOMPUTE_THRESHOLD' use a basic O(N^2) method.  Groups
317 of n digits are converted to limbs, where n is the biggest power of the
318 base b which will fit in a limb, then those groups are accumulated into
319 the result by multiplying by b^n and adding.  This saves
320 multi-precision operations, as per Knuth section 4.4 part E (*note
321 References::).  Some special case code is provided for decimal, giving
322 the compiler a chance to optimize multiplications by 10.
323
324    Above `SET_STR_PRECOMPUTE_THRESHOLD' a sub-quadratic algorithm is
325 used.  First groups of n digits are converted into limbs.  Then adjacent
326 limbs are combined into limb pairs with x*b^n+y, where x and y are the
327 limbs.  Adjacent limb pairs are combined into quads similarly with
328 x*b^(2n)+y.  This continues until a single block remains, that being
329 the result.
330
331    The advantage of this method is that the multiplications for each x
332 are big blocks, allowing Karatsuba and higher algorithms to be used.
333 But the cost of calculating the powers b^(n*2^i) must be overcome.
334 `SET_STR_PRECOMPUTE_THRESHOLD' usually ends up quite big, around 5000
335 digits, and on some processors much bigger still.
336
337    `SET_STR_PRECOMPUTE_THRESHOLD' is based on the input digits (and
338 tuned for decimal), though it might be better based on a limb count, so
339 as to be independent of the base.  But that sort of count isn't used by
340 the base case and so would need some sort of initial calculation or
341 estimate.
342
343    The main reason `SET_STR_PRECOMPUTE_THRESHOLD' is so much bigger
344 than the corresponding `GET_STR_PRECOMPUTE_THRESHOLD' is that
345 `mpn_mul_1' is much faster than `mpn_divrem_1' (often by a factor of 5,
346 or more).
347
348 \1f
349 File: gmp.info,  Node: Other Algorithms,  Next: Assembly Coding,  Prev: Radix Conversion Algorithms,  Up: Algorithms
350
351 16.7 Other Algorithms
352 =====================
353
354 * Menu:
355
356 * Prime Testing Algorithm::
357 * Factorial Algorithm::
358 * Binomial Coefficients Algorithm::
359 * Fibonacci Numbers Algorithm::
360 * Lucas Numbers Algorithm::
361 * Random Number Algorithms::
362
363 \1f
364 File: gmp.info,  Node: Prime Testing Algorithm,  Next: Factorial Algorithm,  Prev: Other Algorithms,  Up: Other Algorithms
365
366 16.7.1 Prime Testing
367 --------------------
368
369 The primality testing in `mpz_probab_prime_p' (*note Number Theoretic
370 Functions::) first does some trial division by small factors and then
371 uses the Miller-Rabin probabilistic primality testing algorithm, as
372 described in Knuth section 4.5.4 algorithm P (*note References::).
373
374    For an odd input n, and with n = q*2^k+1 where q is odd, this
375 algorithm selects a random base x and tests whether x^q mod n is 1 or
376 -1, or an x^(q*2^j) mod n is 1, for 1<=j<=k.  If so then n is probably
377 prime, if not then n is definitely composite.
378
379    Any prime n will pass the test, but some composites do too.  Such
380 composites are known as strong pseudoprimes to base x.  No n is a
381 strong pseudoprime to more than 1/4 of all bases (see Knuth exercise
382 22), hence with x chosen at random there's no more than a 1/4 chance a
383 "probable prime" will in fact be composite.
384
385    In fact strong pseudoprimes are quite rare, making the test much more
386 powerful than this analysis would suggest, but 1/4 is all that's proven
387 for an arbitrary n.
388
389 \1f
390 File: gmp.info,  Node: Factorial Algorithm,  Next: Binomial Coefficients Algorithm,  Prev: Prime Testing Algorithm,  Up: Other Algorithms
391
392 16.7.2 Factorial
393 ----------------
394
395 Factorials are calculated by a combination of removal of twos,
396 powering, and binary splitting.  The procedure can be best illustrated
397 with an example,
398
399      23! = 1.2.3.4.5.6.7.8.9.10.11.12.13.14.15.16.17.18.19.20.21.22.23
400
401 has factors of two removed,
402
403      23! = 2^19.1.1.3.1.5.3.7.1.9.5.11.3.13.7.15.1.17.9.19.5.21.11.23
404
405 and the resulting terms collected up according to their multiplicity,
406
407      23! = 2^19.(3.5)^3.(7.9.11)^2.(13.15.17.19.21.23)
408
409    Each sequence such as 13.15.17.19.21.23 is evaluated by splitting
410 into every second term, as for instance (13.17.21).(15.19.23), and the
411 same recursively on each half.  This is implemented iteratively using
412 some bit twiddling.
413
414    Such splitting is more efficient than repeated Nx1 multiplies since
415 it forms big multiplies, allowing Karatsuba and higher algorithms to be
416 used.  And even below the Karatsuba threshold a big block of work can
417 be more efficient for the basecase algorithm.
418
419    Splitting into subsequences of every second term keeps the resulting
420 products more nearly equal in size than would the simpler approach of
421 say taking the first half and second half of the sequence.  Nearly
422 equal products are more efficient for the current multiply
423 implementation.
424
425 \1f
426 File: gmp.info,  Node: Binomial Coefficients Algorithm,  Next: Fibonacci Numbers Algorithm,  Prev: Factorial Algorithm,  Up: Other Algorithms
427
428 16.7.3 Binomial Coefficients
429 ----------------------------
430
431 Binomial coefficients C(n,k) are calculated by first arranging k <= n/2
432 using C(n,k) = C(n,n-k) if necessary, and then evaluating the following
433 product simply from i=2 to i=k.
434
435                            k  (n-k+i)
436      C(n,k) =  (n-k+1) * prod -------
437                           i=2    i
438
439    It's easy to show that each denominator i will divide the product so
440 far, so the exact division algorithm is used (*note Exact Division::).
441
442    The numerators n-k+i and denominators i are first accumulated into
443 as many fit a limb, to save multi-precision operations, though for
444 `mpz_bin_ui' this applies only to the divisors, since n is an `mpz_t'
445 and n-k+i in general won't fit in a limb at all.
446
447 \1f
448 File: gmp.info,  Node: Fibonacci Numbers Algorithm,  Next: Lucas Numbers Algorithm,  Prev: Binomial Coefficients Algorithm,  Up: Other Algorithms
449
450 16.7.4 Fibonacci Numbers
451 ------------------------
452
453 The Fibonacci functions `mpz_fib_ui' and `mpz_fib2_ui' are designed for
454 calculating isolated F[n] or F[n],F[n-1] values efficiently.
455
456    For small n, a table of single limb values in `__gmp_fib_table' is
457 used.  On a 32-bit limb this goes up to F[47], or on a 64-bit limb up
458 to F[93].  For convenience the table starts at F[-1].
459
460    Beyond the table, values are generated with a binary powering
461 algorithm, calculating a pair F[n] and F[n-1] working from high to low
462 across the bits of n.  The formulas used are
463
464      F[2k+1] = 4*F[k]^2 - F[k-1]^2 + 2*(-1)^k
465      F[2k-1] =   F[k]^2 + F[k-1]^2
466
467      F[2k] = F[2k+1] - F[2k-1]
468
469    At each step, k is the high b bits of n.  If the next bit of n is 0
470 then F[2k],F[2k-1] is used, or if it's a 1 then F[2k+1],F[2k] is used,
471 and the process repeated until all bits of n are incorporated.  Notice
472 these formulas require just two squares per bit of n.
473
474    It'd be possible to handle the first few n above the single limb
475 table with simple additions, using the defining Fibonacci recurrence
476 F[k+1]=F[k]+F[k-1], but this is not done since it usually turns out to
477 be faster for only about 10 or 20 values of n, and including a block of
478 code for just those doesn't seem worthwhile.  If they really mattered
479 it'd be better to extend the data table.
480
481    Using a table avoids lots of calculations on small numbers, and
482 makes small n go fast.  A bigger table would make more small n go fast,
483 it's just a question of balancing size against desired speed.  For GMP
484 the code is kept compact, with the emphasis primarily on a good
485 powering algorithm.
486
487    `mpz_fib2_ui' returns both F[n] and F[n-1], but `mpz_fib_ui' is only
488 interested in F[n].  In this case the last step of the algorithm can
489 become one multiply instead of two squares.  One of the following two
490 formulas is used, according as n is odd or even.
491
492      F[2k]   = F[k]*(F[k]+2F[k-1])
493
494      F[2k+1] = (2F[k]+F[k-1])*(2F[k]-F[k-1]) + 2*(-1)^k
495
496    F[2k+1] here is the same as above, just rearranged to be a multiply.
497 For interest, the 2*(-1)^k term both here and above can be applied
498 just to the low limb of the calculation, without a carry or borrow into
499 further limbs, which saves some code size.  See comments with
500 `mpz_fib_ui' and the internal `mpn_fib2_ui' for how this is done.
501
502 \1f
503 File: gmp.info,  Node: Lucas Numbers Algorithm,  Next: Random Number Algorithms,  Prev: Fibonacci Numbers Algorithm,  Up: Other Algorithms
504
505 16.7.5 Lucas Numbers
506 --------------------
507
508 `mpz_lucnum2_ui' derives a pair of Lucas numbers from a pair of
509 Fibonacci numbers with the following simple formulas.
510
511      L[k]   =   F[k] + 2*F[k-1]
512      L[k-1] = 2*F[k] -   F[k-1]
513
514    `mpz_lucnum_ui' is only interested in L[n], and some work can be
515 saved.  Trailing zero bits on n can be handled with a single square
516 each.
517
518      L[2k] = L[k]^2 - 2*(-1)^k
519
520    And the lowest 1 bit can be handled with one multiply of a pair of
521 Fibonacci numbers, similar to what `mpz_fib_ui' does.
522
523      L[2k+1] = 5*F[k-1]*(2*F[k]+F[k-1]) - 4*(-1)^k
524
525 \1f
526 File: gmp.info,  Node: Random Number Algorithms,  Prev: Lucas Numbers Algorithm,  Up: Other Algorithms
527
528 16.7.6 Random Numbers
529 ---------------------
530
531 For the `urandomb' functions, random numbers are generated simply by
532 concatenating bits produced by the generator.  As long as the generator
533 has good randomness properties this will produce well-distributed N bit
534 numbers.
535
536    For the `urandomm' functions, random numbers in a range 0<=R<N are
537 generated by taking values R of ceil(log2(N)) bits each until one
538 satisfies R<N.  This will normally require only one or two attempts,
539 but the attempts are limited in case the generator is somehow
540 degenerate and produces only 1 bits or similar.
541
542    The Mersenne Twister generator is by Matsumoto and Nishimura (*note
543 References::).  It has a non-repeating period of 2^19937-1, which is a
544 Mersenne prime, hence the name of the generator.  The state is 624
545 words of 32-bits each, which is iterated with one XOR and shift for each
546 32-bit word generated, making the algorithm very fast.  Randomness
547 properties are also very good and this is the default algorithm used by
548 GMP.
549
550    Linear congruential generators are described in many text books, for
551 instance Knuth volume 2 (*note References::).  With a modulus M and
552 parameters A and C, a integer state S is iterated by the formula S <-
553 A*S+C mod M.  At each step the new state is a linear function of the
554 previous, mod M, hence the name of the generator.
555
556    In GMP only moduli of the form 2^N are supported, and the current
557 implementation is not as well optimized as it could be.  Overheads are
558 significant when N is small, and when N is large clearly the multiply
559 at each step will become slow.  This is not a big concern, since the
560 Mersenne Twister generator is better in every respect and is therefore
561 recommended for all normal applications.
562
563    For both generators the current state can be deduced by observing
564 enough output and applying some linear algebra (over GF(2) in the case
565 of the Mersenne Twister).  This generally means raw output is
566 unsuitable for cryptographic applications without further hashing or
567 the like.
568
569 \1f
570 File: gmp.info,  Node: Assembly Coding,  Prev: Other Algorithms,  Up: Algorithms
571
572 16.8 Assembly Coding
573 ====================
574
575 The assembly subroutines in GMP are the most significant source of
576 speed at small to moderate sizes.  At larger sizes algorithm selection
577 becomes more important, but of course speedups in low level routines
578 will still speed up everything proportionally.
579
580    Carry handling and widening multiplies that are important for GMP
581 can't be easily expressed in C.  GCC `asm' blocks help a lot and are
582 provided in `longlong.h', but hand coding low level routines invariably
583 offers a speedup over generic C by a factor of anything from 2 to 10.
584
585 * Menu:
586
587 * Assembly Code Organisation::
588 * Assembly Basics::
589 * Assembly Carry Propagation::
590 * Assembly Cache Handling::
591 * Assembly Functional Units::
592 * Assembly Floating Point::
593 * Assembly SIMD Instructions::
594 * Assembly Software Pipelining::
595 * Assembly Loop Unrolling::
596 * Assembly Writing Guide::
597
598 \1f
599 File: gmp.info,  Node: Assembly Code Organisation,  Next: Assembly Basics,  Prev: Assembly Coding,  Up: Assembly Coding
600
601 16.8.1 Code Organisation
602 ------------------------
603
604 The various `mpn' subdirectories contain machine-dependent code, written
605 in C or assembly.  The `mpn/generic' subdirectory contains default code,
606 used when there's no machine-specific version of a particular file.
607
608    Each `mpn' subdirectory is for an ISA family.  Generally 32-bit and
609 64-bit variants in a family cannot share code and have separate
610 directories.  Within a family further subdirectories may exist for CPU
611 variants.
612
613    In each directory a `nails' subdirectory may exist, holding code with
614 nails support for that CPU variant.  A `NAILS_SUPPORT' directive in each
615 file indicates the nails values the code handles.  Nails code only
616 exists where it's faster, or promises to be faster, than plain code.
617 There's no effort put into nails if they're not going to enhance a
618 given CPU.
619
620 \1f
621 File: gmp.info,  Node: Assembly Basics,  Next: Assembly Carry Propagation,  Prev: Assembly Code Organisation,  Up: Assembly Coding
622
623 16.8.2 Assembly Basics
624 ----------------------
625
626 `mpn_addmul_1' and `mpn_submul_1' are the most important routines for
627 overall GMP performance.  All multiplications and divisions come down to
628 repeated calls to these.  `mpn_add_n', `mpn_sub_n', `mpn_lshift' and
629 `mpn_rshift' are next most important.
630
631    On some CPUs assembly versions of the internal functions
632 `mpn_mul_basecase' and `mpn_sqr_basecase' give significant speedups,
633 mainly through avoiding function call overheads.  They can also
634 potentially make better use of a wide superscalar processor, as can
635 bigger primitives like `mpn_addmul_2' or `mpn_addmul_4'.
636
637    The restrictions on overlaps between sources and destinations (*note
638 Low-level Functions::) are designed to facilitate a variety of
639 implementations.  For example, knowing `mpn_add_n' won't have partly
640 overlapping sources and destination means reading can be done far ahead
641 of writing on superscalar processors, and loops can be vectorized on a
642 vector processor, depending on the carry handling.
643
644 \1f
645 File: gmp.info,  Node: Assembly Carry Propagation,  Next: Assembly Cache Handling,  Prev: Assembly Basics,  Up: Assembly Coding
646
647 16.8.3 Carry Propagation
648 ------------------------
649
650 The problem that presents most challenges in GMP is propagating carries
651 from one limb to the next.  In functions like `mpn_addmul_1' and
652 `mpn_add_n', carries are the only dependencies between limb operations.
653
654    On processors with carry flags, a straightforward CISC style `adc' is
655 generally best.  AMD K6 `mpn_addmul_1' however is an example of an
656 unusual set of circumstances where a branch works out better.
657
658    On RISC processors generally an add and compare for overflow is
659 used.  This sort of thing can be seen in `mpn/generic/aors_n.c'.  Some
660 carry propagation schemes require 4 instructions, meaning at least 4
661 cycles per limb, but other schemes may use just 1 or 2.  On wide
662 superscalar processors performance may be completely determined by the
663 number of dependent instructions between carry-in and carry-out for
664 each limb.
665
666    On vector processors good use can be made of the fact that a carry
667 bit only very rarely propagates more than one limb.  When adding a
668 single bit to a limb, there's only a carry out if that limb was
669 `0xFF...FF' which on random data will be only 1 in 2^mp_bits_per_limb.
670 `mpn/cray/add_n.c' is an example of this, it adds all limbs in
671 parallel, adds one set of carry bits in parallel and then only rarely
672 needs to fall through to a loop propagating further carries.
673
674    On the x86s, GCC (as of version 2.95.2) doesn't generate
675 particularly good code for the RISC style idioms that are necessary to
676 handle carry bits in C.  Often conditional jumps are generated where
677 `adc' or `sbb' forms would be better.  And so unfortunately almost any
678 loop involving carry bits needs to be coded in assembly for best
679 results.
680
681 \1f
682 File: gmp.info,  Node: Assembly Cache Handling,  Next: Assembly Functional Units,  Prev: Assembly Carry Propagation,  Up: Assembly Coding
683
684 16.8.4 Cache Handling
685 ---------------------
686
687 GMP aims to perform well both on operands that fit entirely in L1 cache
688 and those which don't.
689
690    Basic routines like `mpn_add_n' or `mpn_lshift' are often used on
691 large operands, so L2 and main memory performance is important for them.
692 `mpn_mul_1' and `mpn_addmul_1' are mostly used for multiply and square
693 basecases, so L1 performance matters most for them, unless assembly
694 versions of `mpn_mul_basecase' and `mpn_sqr_basecase' exist, in which
695 case the remaining uses are mostly for larger operands.
696
697    For L2 or main memory operands, memory access times will almost
698 certainly be more than the calculation time.  The aim therefore is to
699 maximize memory throughput, by starting a load of the next cache line
700 while processing the contents of the previous one.  Clearly this is
701 only possible if the chip has a lock-up free cache or some sort of
702 prefetch instruction.  Most current chips have both these features.
703
704    Prefetching sources combines well with loop unrolling, since a
705 prefetch can be initiated once per unrolled loop (or more than once if
706 the loop covers more than one cache line).
707
708    On CPUs without write-allocate caches, prefetching destinations will
709 ensure individual stores don't go further down the cache hierarchy,
710 limiting bandwidth.  Of course for calculations which are slow anyway,
711 like `mpn_divrem_1', write-throughs might be fine.
712
713    The distance ahead to prefetch will be determined by memory latency
714 versus throughput.  The aim of course is to have data arriving
715 continuously, at peak throughput.  Some CPUs have limits on the number
716 of fetches or prefetches in progress.
717
718    If a special prefetch instruction doesn't exist then a plain load
719 can be used, but in that case care must be taken not to attempt to read
720 past the end of an operand, since that might produce a segmentation
721 violation.
722
723    Some CPUs or systems have hardware that detects sequential memory
724 accesses and initiates suitable cache movements automatically, making
725 life easy.
726
727 \1f
728 File: gmp.info,  Node: Assembly Functional Units,  Next: Assembly Floating Point,  Prev: Assembly Cache Handling,  Up: Assembly Coding
729
730 16.8.5 Functional Units
731 -----------------------
732
733 When choosing an approach for an assembly loop, consideration is given
734 to what operations can execute simultaneously and what throughput can
735 thereby be achieved.  In some cases an algorithm can be tweaked to
736 accommodate available resources.
737
738    Loop control will generally require a counter and pointer updates,
739 costing as much as 5 instructions, plus any delays a branch introduces.
740 CPU addressing modes might reduce pointer updates, perhaps by allowing
741 just one updating pointer and others expressed as offsets from it, or
742 on CISC chips with all addressing done with the loop counter as a
743 scaled index.
744
745    The final loop control cost can be amortised by processing several
746 limbs in each iteration (*note Assembly Loop Unrolling::).  This at
747 least ensures loop control isn't a big fraction the work done.
748
749    Memory throughput is always a limit.  If perhaps only one load or
750 one store can be done per cycle then 3 cycles/limb will the top speed
751 for "binary" operations like `mpn_add_n', and any code achieving that
752 is optimal.
753
754    Integer resources can be freed up by having the loop counter in a
755 float register, or by pressing the float units into use for some
756 multiplying, perhaps doing every second limb on the float side (*note
757 Assembly Floating Point::).
758
759    Float resources can be freed up by doing carry propagation on the
760 integer side, or even by doing integer to float conversions in integers
761 using bit twiddling.
762
763 \1f
764 File: gmp.info,  Node: Assembly Floating Point,  Next: Assembly SIMD Instructions,  Prev: Assembly Functional Units,  Up: Assembly Coding
765
766 16.8.6 Floating Point
767 ---------------------
768
769 Floating point arithmetic is used in GMP for multiplications on CPUs
770 with poor integer multipliers.  It's mostly useful for `mpn_mul_1',
771 `mpn_addmul_1' and `mpn_submul_1' on 64-bit machines, and
772 `mpn_mul_basecase' on both 32-bit and 64-bit machines.
773
774    With IEEE 53-bit double precision floats, integer multiplications
775 producing up to 53 bits will give exact results.  Breaking a 64x64
776 multiplication into eight 16x32->48 bit pieces is convenient.  With
777 some care though six 21x32->53 bit products can be used, if one of the
778 lower two 21-bit pieces also uses the sign bit.
779
780    For the `mpn_mul_1' family of functions on a 64-bit machine, the
781 invariant single limb is split at the start, into 3 or 4 pieces.
782 Inside the loop, the bignum operand is split into 32-bit pieces.  Fast
783 conversion of these unsigned 32-bit pieces to floating point is highly
784 machine-dependent.  In some cases, reading the data into the integer
785 unit, zero-extending to 64-bits, then transferring to the floating
786 point unit back via memory is the only option.
787
788    Converting partial products back to 64-bit limbs is usually best
789 done as a signed conversion.  Since all values are smaller than 2^53,
790 signed and unsigned are the same, but most processors lack unsigned
791 conversions.
792
793
794
795    Here is a diagram showing 16x32 bit products for an `mpn_mul_1' or
796 `mpn_addmul_1' with a 64-bit limb.  The single limb operand V is split
797 into four 16-bit parts.  The multi-limb operand U is split in the loop
798 into two 32-bit parts.
799
800                      +---+---+---+---+
801                      |v48|v32|v16|v00|    V operand
802                      +---+---+---+---+
803
804                      +-------+---+---+
805                  x   |  u32  |  u00  |    U operand (one limb)
806                      +---------------+
807
808      ---------------------------------
809
810                          +-----------+
811                          | u00 x v00 |    p00    48-bit products
812                          +-----------+
813                      +-----------+
814                      | u00 x v16 |        p16
815                      +-----------+
816                  +-----------+
817                  | u00 x v32 |            p32
818                  +-----------+
819              +-----------+
820              | u00 x v48 |                p48
821              +-----------+
822                  +-----------+
823                  | u32 x v00 |            r32
824                  +-----------+
825              +-----------+
826              | u32 x v16 |                r48
827              +-----------+
828          +-----------+
829          | u32 x v32 |                    r64
830          +-----------+
831      +-----------+
832      | u32 x v48 |                        r80
833      +-----------+
834
835    p32 and r32 can be summed using floating-point addition, and
836 likewise p48 and r48.  p00 and p16 can be summed with r64 and r80 from
837 the previous iteration.
838
839    For each loop then, four 49-bit quantities are transferred to the
840 integer unit, aligned as follows,
841
842      |-----64bits----|-----64bits----|
843                         +------------+
844                         | p00 + r64' |    i00
845                         +------------+
846                     +------------+
847                     | p16 + r80' |        i16
848                     +------------+
849                 +------------+
850                 | p32 + r32  |            i32
851                 +------------+
852             +------------+
853             | p48 + r48  |                i48
854             +------------+
855
856    The challenge then is to sum these efficiently and add in a carry
857 limb, generating a low 64-bit result limb and a high 33-bit carry limb
858 (i48 extends 33 bits into the high half).
859
860 \1f
861 File: gmp.info,  Node: Assembly SIMD Instructions,  Next: Assembly Software Pipelining,  Prev: Assembly Floating Point,  Up: Assembly Coding
862
863 16.8.7 SIMD Instructions
864 ------------------------
865
866 The single-instruction multiple-data support in current microprocessors
867 is aimed at signal processing algorithms where each data point can be
868 treated more or less independently.  There's generally not much support
869 for propagating the sort of carries that arise in GMP.
870
871    SIMD multiplications of say four 16x16 bit multiplies only do as much
872 work as one 32x32 from GMP's point of view, and need some shifts and
873 adds besides.  But of course if say the SIMD form is fully pipelined
874 and uses less instruction decoding then it may still be worthwhile.
875
876    On the x86 chips, MMX has so far found a use in `mpn_rshift' and
877 `mpn_lshift', and is used in a special case for 16-bit multipliers in
878 the P55 `mpn_mul_1'.  SSE2 is used for Pentium 4 `mpn_mul_1',
879 `mpn_addmul_1', and `mpn_submul_1'.
880
881 \1f
882 File: gmp.info,  Node: Assembly Software Pipelining,  Next: Assembly Loop Unrolling,  Prev: Assembly SIMD Instructions,  Up: Assembly Coding
883
884 16.8.8 Software Pipelining
885 --------------------------
886
887 Software pipelining consists of scheduling instructions around the
888 branch point in a loop.  For example a loop might issue a load not for
889 use in the present iteration but the next, thereby allowing extra
890 cycles for the data to arrive from memory.
891
892    Naturally this is wanted only when doing things like loads or
893 multiplies that take several cycles to complete, and only where a CPU
894 has multiple functional units so that other work can be done in the
895 meantime.
896
897    A pipeline with several stages will have a data value in progress at
898 each stage and each loop iteration moves them along one stage.  This is
899 like juggling.
900
901    If the latency of some instruction is greater than the loop time
902 then it will be necessary to unroll, so one register has a result ready
903 to use while another (or multiple others) are still in progress.
904 (*note Assembly Loop Unrolling::).
905
906 \1f
907 File: gmp.info,  Node: Assembly Loop Unrolling,  Next: Assembly Writing Guide,  Prev: Assembly Software Pipelining,  Up: Assembly Coding
908
909 16.8.9 Loop Unrolling
910 ---------------------
911
912 Loop unrolling consists of replicating code so that several limbs are
913 processed in each loop.  At a minimum this reduces loop overheads by a
914 corresponding factor, but it can also allow better register usage, for
915 example alternately using one register combination and then another.
916 Judicious use of `m4' macros can help avoid lots of duplication in the
917 source code.
918
919    Any amount of unrolling can be handled with a loop counter that's
920 decremented by N each time, stopping when the remaining count is less
921 than the further N the loop will process.  Or by subtracting N at the
922 start, the termination condition becomes when the counter C is less
923 than 0 (and the count of remaining limbs is C+N).
924
925    Alternately for a power of 2 unroll the loop count and remainder can
926 be established with a shift and mask.  This is convenient if also
927 making a computed jump into the middle of a large loop.
928
929    The limbs not a multiple of the unrolling can be handled in various
930 ways, for example
931
932    * A simple loop at the end (or the start) to process the excess.
933      Care will be wanted that it isn't too much slower than the
934      unrolled part.
935
936    * A set of binary tests, for example after an 8-limb unrolling, test
937      for 4 more limbs to process, then a further 2 more or not, and
938      finally 1 more or not.  This will probably take more code space
939      than a simple loop.
940
941    * A `switch' statement, providing separate code for each possible
942      excess, for example an 8-limb unrolling would have separate code
943      for 0 remaining, 1 remaining, etc, up to 7 remaining.  This might
944      take a lot of code, but may be the best way to optimize all cases
945      in combination with a deep pipelined loop.
946
947    * A computed jump into the middle of the loop, thus making the first
948      iteration handle the excess.  This should make times smoothly
949      increase with size, which is attractive, but setups for the jump
950      and adjustments for pointers can be tricky and could become quite
951      difficult in combination with deep pipelining.
952
953 \1f
954 File: gmp.info,  Node: Assembly Writing Guide,  Prev: Assembly Loop Unrolling,  Up: Assembly Coding
955
956 16.8.10 Writing Guide
957 ---------------------
958
959 This is a guide to writing software pipelined loops for processing limb
960 vectors in assembly.
961
962    First determine the algorithm and which instructions are needed.
963 Code it without unrolling or scheduling, to make sure it works.  On a
964 3-operand CPU try to write each new value to a new register, this will
965 greatly simplify later steps.
966
967    Then note for each instruction the functional unit and/or issue port
968 requirements.  If an instruction can use either of two units, like U0
969 or U1 then make a category "U0/U1".  Count the total using each unit
970 (or combined unit), and count all instructions.
971
972    Figure out from those counts the best possible loop time.  The goal
973 will be to find a perfect schedule where instruction latencies are
974 completely hidden.  The total instruction count might be the limiting
975 factor, or perhaps a particular functional unit.  It might be possible
976 to tweak the instructions to help the limiting factor.
977
978    Suppose the loop time is N, then make N issue buckets, with the
979 final loop branch at the end of the last.  Now fill the buckets with
980 dummy instructions using the functional units desired.  Run this to
981 make sure the intended speed is reached.
982
983    Now replace the dummy instructions with the real instructions from
984 the slow but correct loop you started with.  The first will typically
985 be a load instruction.  Then the instruction using that value is placed
986 in a bucket an appropriate distance down.  Run the loop again, to check
987 it still runs at target speed.
988
989    Keep placing instructions, frequently measuring the loop.  After a
990 few you will need to wrap around from the last bucket back to the top
991 of the loop.  If you used the new-register for new-value strategy above
992 then there will be no register conflicts.  If not then take care not to
993 clobber something already in use.  Changing registers at this time is
994 very error prone.
995
996    The loop will overlap two or more of the original loop iterations,
997 and the computation of one vector element result will be started in one
998 iteration of the new loop, and completed one or several iterations
999 later.
1000
1001    The final step is to create feed-in and wind-down code for the loop.
1002 A good way to do this is to make a copy (or copies) of the loop at the
1003 start and delete those instructions which don't have valid antecedents,
1004 and at the end replicate and delete those whose results are unwanted
1005 (including any further loads).
1006
1007    The loop will have a minimum number of limbs loaded and processed,
1008 so the feed-in code must test if the request size is smaller and skip
1009 either to a suitable part of the wind-down or to special code for small
1010 sizes.
1011
1012 \1f
1013 File: gmp.info,  Node: Internals,  Next: Contributors,  Prev: Algorithms,  Up: Top
1014
1015 17 Internals
1016 ************
1017
1018 *This chapter is provided only for informational purposes and the
1019 various internals described here may change in future GMP releases.
1020 Applications expecting to be compatible with future releases should use
1021 only the documented interfaces described in previous chapters.*
1022
1023 * Menu:
1024
1025 * Integer Internals::
1026 * Rational Internals::
1027 * Float Internals::
1028 * Raw Output Internals::
1029 * C++ Interface Internals::
1030
1031 \1f
1032 File: gmp.info,  Node: Integer Internals,  Next: Rational Internals,  Prev: Internals,  Up: Internals
1033
1034 17.1 Integer Internals
1035 ======================
1036
1037 `mpz_t' variables represent integers using sign and magnitude, in space
1038 dynamically allocated and reallocated.  The fields are as follows.
1039
1040 `_mp_size'
1041      The number of limbs, or the negative of that when representing a
1042      negative integer.  Zero is represented by `_mp_size' set to zero,
1043      in which case the `_mp_d' data is unused.
1044
1045 `_mp_d'
1046      A pointer to an array of limbs which is the magnitude.  These are
1047      stored "little endian" as per the `mpn' functions, so `_mp_d[0]'
1048      is the least significant limb and `_mp_d[ABS(_mp_size)-1]' is the
1049      most significant.  Whenever `_mp_size' is non-zero, the most
1050      significant limb is non-zero.
1051
1052      Currently there's always at least one limb allocated, so for
1053      instance `mpz_set_ui' never needs to reallocate, and `mpz_get_ui'
1054      can fetch `_mp_d[0]' unconditionally (though its value is then
1055      only wanted if `_mp_size' is non-zero).
1056
1057 `_mp_alloc'
1058      `_mp_alloc' is the number of limbs currently allocated at `_mp_d',
1059      and naturally `_mp_alloc >= ABS(_mp_size)'.  When an `mpz' routine
1060      is about to (or might be about to) increase `_mp_size', it checks
1061      `_mp_alloc' to see whether there's enough space, and reallocates
1062      if not.  `MPZ_REALLOC' is generally used for this.
1063
1064    The various bitwise logical functions like `mpz_and' behave as if
1065 negative values were twos complement.  But sign and magnitude is always
1066 used internally, and necessary adjustments are made during the
1067 calculations.  Sometimes this isn't pretty, but sign and magnitude are
1068 best for other routines.
1069
1070    Some internal temporary variables are setup with `MPZ_TMP_INIT' and
1071 these have `_mp_d' space obtained from `TMP_ALLOC' rather than the
1072 memory allocation functions.  Care is taken to ensure that these are
1073 big enough that no reallocation is necessary (since it would have
1074 unpredictable consequences).
1075
1076    `_mp_size' and `_mp_alloc' are `int', although `mp_size_t' is
1077 usually a `long'.  This is done to make the fields just 32 bits on some
1078 64 bits systems, thereby saving a few bytes of data space but still
1079 providing plenty of range.
1080
1081 \1f
1082 File: gmp.info,  Node: Rational Internals,  Next: Float Internals,  Prev: Integer Internals,  Up: Internals
1083
1084 17.2 Rational Internals
1085 =======================
1086
1087 `mpq_t' variables represent rationals using an `mpz_t' numerator and
1088 denominator (*note Integer Internals::).
1089
1090    The canonical form adopted is denominator positive (and non-zero),
1091 no common factors between numerator and denominator, and zero uniquely
1092 represented as 0/1.
1093
1094    It's believed that casting out common factors at each stage of a
1095 calculation is best in general.  A GCD is an O(N^2) operation so it's
1096 better to do a few small ones immediately than to delay and have to do
1097 a big one later.  Knowing the numerator and denominator have no common
1098 factors can be used for example in `mpq_mul' to make only two cross
1099 GCDs necessary, not four.
1100
1101    This general approach to common factors is badly sub-optimal in the
1102 presence of simple factorizations or little prospect for cancellation,
1103 but GMP has no way to know when this will occur.  As per *Note
1104 Efficiency::, that's left to applications.  The `mpq_t' framework might
1105 still suit, with `mpq_numref' and `mpq_denref' for direct access to the
1106 numerator and denominator, or of course `mpz_t' variables can be used
1107 directly.
1108
1109 \1f
1110 File: gmp.info,  Node: Float Internals,  Next: Raw Output Internals,  Prev: Rational Internals,  Up: Internals
1111
1112 17.3 Float Internals
1113 ====================
1114
1115 Efficient calculation is the primary aim of GMP floats and the use of
1116 whole limbs and simple rounding facilitates this.
1117
1118    `mpf_t' floats have a variable precision mantissa and a single
1119 machine word signed exponent.  The mantissa is represented using sign
1120 and magnitude.
1121
1122         most                   least
1123      significant            significant
1124         limb                   limb
1125
1126                                  _mp_d
1127       |---- _mp_exp --->           |
1128        _____ _____ _____ _____ _____
1129       |_____|_____|_____|_____|_____|
1130                         . <------------ radix point
1131
1132        <-------- _mp_size --------->
1133
1134 The fields are as follows.
1135
1136 `_mp_size'
1137      The number of limbs currently in use, or the negative of that when
1138      representing a negative value.  Zero is represented by `_mp_size'
1139      and `_mp_exp' both set to zero, and in that case the `_mp_d' data
1140      is unused.  (In the future `_mp_exp' might be undefined when
1141      representing zero.)
1142
1143 `_mp_prec'
1144      The precision of the mantissa, in limbs.  In any calculation the
1145      aim is to produce `_mp_prec' limbs of result (the most significant
1146      being non-zero).
1147
1148 `_mp_d'
1149      A pointer to the array of limbs which is the absolute value of the
1150      mantissa.  These are stored "little endian" as per the `mpn'
1151      functions, so `_mp_d[0]' is the least significant limb and
1152      `_mp_d[ABS(_mp_size)-1]' the most significant.
1153
1154      The most significant limb is always non-zero, but there are no
1155      other restrictions on its value, in particular the highest 1 bit
1156      can be anywhere within the limb.
1157
1158      `_mp_prec+1' limbs are allocated to `_mp_d', the extra limb being
1159      for convenience (see below).  There are no reallocations during a
1160      calculation, only in a change of precision with `mpf_set_prec'.
1161
1162 `_mp_exp'
1163      The exponent, in limbs, determining the location of the implied
1164      radix point.  Zero means the radix point is just above the most
1165      significant limb.  Positive values mean a radix point offset
1166      towards the lower limbs and hence a value >= 1, as for example in
1167      the diagram above.  Negative exponents mean a radix point further
1168      above the highest limb.
1169
1170      Naturally the exponent can be any value, it doesn't have to fall
1171      within the limbs as the diagram shows, it can be a long way above
1172      or a long way below.  Limbs other than those included in the
1173      `{_mp_d,_mp_size}' data are treated as zero.
1174
1175    The `_mp_size' and `_mp_prec' fields are `int', although the
1176 `mp_size_t' type is usually a `long'.  The `_mp_exp' field is usually
1177 `long'.  This is done to make some fields just 32 bits on some 64 bits
1178 systems, thereby saving a few bytes of data space but still providing
1179 plenty of precision and a very large range.
1180
1181
1182 The following various points should be noted.
1183
1184 Low Zeros
1185      The least significant limbs `_mp_d[0]' etc can be zero, though
1186      such low zeros can always be ignored.  Routines likely to produce
1187      low zeros check and avoid them to save time in subsequent
1188      calculations, but for most routines they're quite unlikely and
1189      aren't checked.
1190
1191 Mantissa Size Range
1192      The `_mp_size' count of limbs in use can be less than `_mp_prec' if
1193      the value can be represented in less.  This means low precision
1194      values or small integers stored in a high precision `mpf_t' can
1195      still be operated on efficiently.
1196
1197      `_mp_size' can also be greater than `_mp_prec'.  Firstly a value is
1198      allowed to use all of the `_mp_prec+1' limbs available at `_mp_d',
1199      and secondly when `mpf_set_prec_raw' lowers `_mp_prec' it leaves
1200      `_mp_size' unchanged and so the size can be arbitrarily bigger than
1201      `_mp_prec'.
1202
1203 Rounding
1204      All rounding is done on limb boundaries.  Calculating `_mp_prec'
1205      limbs with the high non-zero will ensure the application requested
1206      minimum precision is obtained.
1207
1208      The use of simple "trunc" rounding towards zero is efficient,
1209      since there's no need to examine extra limbs and increment or
1210      decrement.
1211
1212 Bit Shifts
1213      Since the exponent is in limbs, there are no bit shifts in basic
1214      operations like `mpf_add' and `mpf_mul'.  When differing exponents
1215      are encountered all that's needed is to adjust pointers to line up
1216      the relevant limbs.
1217
1218      Of course `mpf_mul_2exp' and `mpf_div_2exp' will require bit
1219      shifts, but the choice is between an exponent in limbs which
1220      requires shifts there, or one in bits which requires them almost
1221      everywhere else.
1222
1223 Use of `_mp_prec+1' Limbs
1224      The extra limb on `_mp_d' (`_mp_prec+1' rather than just
1225      `_mp_prec') helps when an `mpf' routine might get a carry from its
1226      operation.  `mpf_add' for instance will do an `mpn_add' of
1227      `_mp_prec' limbs.  If there's no carry then that's the result, but
1228      if there is a carry then it's stored in the extra limb of space and
1229      `_mp_size' becomes `_mp_prec+1'.
1230
1231      Whenever `_mp_prec+1' limbs are held in a variable, the low limb
1232      is not needed for the intended precision, only the `_mp_prec' high
1233      limbs.  But zeroing it out or moving the rest down is unnecessary.
1234      Subsequent routines reading the value will simply take the high
1235      limbs they need, and this will be `_mp_prec' if their target has
1236      that same precision.  This is no more than a pointer adjustment,
1237      and must be checked anyway since the destination precision can be
1238      different from the sources.
1239
1240      Copy functions like `mpf_set' will retain a full `_mp_prec+1' limbs
1241      if available.  This ensures that a variable which has `_mp_size'
1242      equal to `_mp_prec+1' will get its full exact value copied.
1243      Strictly speaking this is unnecessary since only `_mp_prec' limbs
1244      are needed for the application's requested precision, but it's
1245      considered that an `mpf_set' from one variable into another of the
1246      same precision ought to produce an exact copy.
1247
1248 Application Precisions
1249      `__GMPF_BITS_TO_PREC' converts an application requested precision
1250      to an `_mp_prec'.  The value in bits is rounded up to a whole limb
1251      then an extra limb is added since the most significant limb of
1252      `_mp_d' is only non-zero and therefore might contain only one bit.
1253
1254      `__GMPF_PREC_TO_BITS' does the reverse conversion, and removes the
1255      extra limb from `_mp_prec' before converting to bits.  The net
1256      effect of reading back with `mpf_get_prec' is simply the precision
1257      rounded up to a multiple of `mp_bits_per_limb'.
1258
1259      Note that the extra limb added here for the high only being
1260      non-zero is in addition to the extra limb allocated to `_mp_d'.
1261      For example with a 32-bit limb, an application request for 250
1262      bits will be rounded up to 8 limbs, then an extra added for the
1263      high being only non-zero, giving an `_mp_prec' of 9.  `_mp_d' then
1264      gets 10 limbs allocated.  Reading back with `mpf_get_prec' will
1265      take `_mp_prec' subtract 1 limb and multiply by 32, giving 256
1266      bits.
1267
1268      Strictly speaking, the fact the high limb has at least one bit
1269      means that a float with, say, 3 limbs of 32-bits each will be
1270      holding at least 65 bits, but for the purposes of `mpf_t' it's
1271      considered simply to be 64 bits, a nice multiple of the limb size.
1272
1273 \1f
1274 File: gmp.info,  Node: Raw Output Internals,  Next: C++ Interface Internals,  Prev: Float Internals,  Up: Internals
1275
1276 17.4 Raw Output Internals
1277 =========================
1278
1279 `mpz_out_raw' uses the following format.
1280
1281      +------+------------------------+
1282      | size |       data bytes       |
1283      +------+------------------------+
1284
1285    The size is 4 bytes written most significant byte first, being the
1286 number of subsequent data bytes, or the twos complement negative of
1287 that when a negative integer is represented.  The data bytes are the
1288 absolute value of the integer, written most significant byte first.
1289
1290    The most significant data byte is always non-zero, so the output is
1291 the same on all systems, irrespective of limb size.
1292
1293    In GMP 1, leading zero bytes were written to pad the data bytes to a
1294 multiple of the limb size.  `mpz_inp_raw' will still accept this, for
1295 compatibility.
1296
1297    The use of "big endian" for both the size and data fields is
1298 deliberate, it makes the data easy to read in a hex dump of a file.
1299 Unfortunately it also means that the limb data must be reversed when
1300 reading or writing, so neither a big endian nor little endian system
1301 can just read and write `_mp_d'.
1302
1303 \1f
1304 File: gmp.info,  Node: C++ Interface Internals,  Prev: Raw Output Internals,  Up: Internals
1305
1306 17.5 C++ Interface Internals
1307 ============================
1308
1309 A system of expression templates is used to ensure something like
1310 `a=b+c' turns into a simple call to `mpz_add' etc.  For `mpf_class' the
1311 scheme also ensures the precision of the final destination is used for
1312 any temporaries within a statement like `f=w*x+y*z'.  These are
1313 important features which a naive implementation cannot provide.
1314
1315    A simplified description of the scheme follows.  The true scheme is
1316 complicated by the fact that expressions have different return types.
1317 For detailed information, refer to the source code.
1318
1319    To perform an operation, say, addition, we first define a "function
1320 object" evaluating it,
1321
1322      struct __gmp_binary_plus
1323      {
1324        static void eval(mpf_t f, mpf_t g, mpf_t h) { mpf_add(f, g, h); }
1325      };
1326
1327 And an "additive expression" object,
1328
1329      __gmp_expr<__gmp_binary_expr<mpf_class, mpf_class, __gmp_binary_plus> >
1330      operator+(const mpf_class &f, const mpf_class &g)
1331      {
1332        return __gmp_expr
1333          <__gmp_binary_expr<mpf_class, mpf_class, __gmp_binary_plus> >(f, g);
1334      }
1335
1336    The seemingly redundant `__gmp_expr<__gmp_binary_expr<...>>' is used
1337 to encapsulate any possible kind of expression into a single template
1338 type.  In fact even `mpf_class' etc are `typedef' specializations of
1339 `__gmp_expr'.
1340
1341    Next we define assignment of `__gmp_expr' to `mpf_class'.
1342
1343      template <class T>
1344      mpf_class & mpf_class::operator=(const __gmp_expr<T> &expr)
1345      {
1346        expr.eval(this->get_mpf_t(), this->precision());
1347        return *this;
1348      }
1349
1350      template <class Op>
1351      void __gmp_expr<__gmp_binary_expr<mpf_class, mpf_class, Op> >::eval
1352      (mpf_t f, mp_bitcnt_t precision)
1353      {
1354        Op::eval(f, expr.val1.get_mpf_t(), expr.val2.get_mpf_t());
1355      }
1356
1357    where `expr.val1' and `expr.val2' are references to the expression's
1358 operands (here `expr' is the `__gmp_binary_expr' stored within the
1359 `__gmp_expr').
1360
1361    This way, the expression is actually evaluated only at the time of
1362 assignment, when the required precision (that of `f') is known.
1363 Furthermore the target `mpf_t' is now available, thus we can call
1364 `mpf_add' directly with `f' as the output argument.
1365
1366    Compound expressions are handled by defining operators taking
1367 subexpressions as their arguments, like this:
1368
1369      template <class T, class U>
1370      __gmp_expr
1371      <__gmp_binary_expr<__gmp_expr<T>, __gmp_expr<U>, __gmp_binary_plus> >
1372      operator+(const __gmp_expr<T> &expr1, const __gmp_expr<U> &expr2)
1373      {
1374        return __gmp_expr
1375          <__gmp_binary_expr<__gmp_expr<T>, __gmp_expr<U>, __gmp_binary_plus> >
1376          (expr1, expr2);
1377      }
1378
1379    And the corresponding specializations of `__gmp_expr::eval':
1380
1381      template <class T, class U, class Op>
1382      void __gmp_expr
1383      <__gmp_binary_expr<__gmp_expr<T>, __gmp_expr<U>, Op> >::eval
1384      (mpf_t f, mp_bitcnt_t precision)
1385      {
1386        // declare two temporaries
1387        mpf_class temp1(expr.val1, precision), temp2(expr.val2, precision);
1388        Op::eval(f, temp1.get_mpf_t(), temp2.get_mpf_t());
1389      }
1390
1391    The expression is thus recursively evaluated to any level of
1392 complexity and all subexpressions are evaluated to the precision of `f'.
1393
1394 \1f
1395 File: gmp.info,  Node: Contributors,  Next: References,  Prev: Internals,  Up: Top
1396
1397 Appendix A Contributors
1398 ***********************
1399
1400 Torbjo"rn Granlund wrote the original GMP library and is still the main
1401 developer.  Code not explicitly attributed to others, was contributed by
1402 Torbjo"rn.  Several other individuals and organizations have contributed
1403 GMP.  Here is a list in chronological order on first contribution:
1404
1405    Gunnar Sjo"din and Hans Riesel helped with mathematical problems in
1406 early versions of the library.
1407
1408    Richard Stallman helped with the interface design and revised the
1409 first version of this manual.
1410
1411    Brian Beuning and Doug Lea helped with testing of early versions of
1412 the library and made creative suggestions.
1413
1414    John Amanatides of York University in Canada contributed the function
1415 `mpz_probab_prime_p'.
1416
1417    Paul Zimmermann wrote the REDC-based mpz_powm code, the
1418 Scho"nhage-Strassen FFT multiply code, and the Karatsuba square root
1419 code.  He also improved the Toom3 code for GMP 4.2.  Paul sparked the
1420 development of GMP 2, with his comparisons between bignum packages.
1421 The ECMNET project Paul is organizing was a driving force behind many
1422 of the optimizations in GMP 3.  Paul also wrote the new GMP 4.3 nth
1423 root code (with Torbjo"rn).
1424
1425    Ken Weber (Kent State University, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande
1426 do Sul) contributed now defunct versions of `mpz_gcd', `mpz_divexact',
1427 `mpn_gcd', and `mpn_bdivmod', partially supported by CNPq (Brazil)
1428 grant 301314194-2.
1429
1430    Per Bothner of Cygnus Support helped to set up GMP to use Cygnus'
1431 configure.  He has also made valuable suggestions and tested numerous
1432 intermediary releases.
1433
1434    Joachim Hollman was involved in the design of the `mpf' interface,
1435 and in the `mpz' design revisions for version 2.
1436
1437    Bennet Yee contributed the initial versions of `mpz_jacobi' and
1438 `mpz_legendre'.
1439
1440    Andreas Schwab contributed the files `mpn/m68k/lshift.S' and
1441 `mpn/m68k/rshift.S' (now in `.asm' form).
1442
1443    Robert Harley of Inria, France and David Seal of ARM, England,
1444 suggested clever improvements for population count.  Robert also wrote
1445 highly optimized Karatsuba and 3-way Toom multiplication functions for
1446 GMP 3, and contributed the ARM assembly code.
1447
1448    Torsten Ekedahl of the Mathematical department of Stockholm
1449 University provided significant inspiration during several phases of
1450 the GMP development.  His mathematical expertise helped improve several
1451 algorithms.
1452
1453    Linus Nordberg wrote the new configure system based on autoconf and
1454 implemented the new random functions.
1455
1456    Kevin Ryde worked on a large number of things: optimized x86 code,
1457 m4 asm macros, parameter tuning, speed measuring, the configure system,
1458 function inlining, divisibility tests, bit scanning, Jacobi symbols,
1459 Fibonacci and Lucas number functions, printf and scanf functions, perl
1460 interface, demo expression parser, the algorithms chapter in the
1461 manual, `gmpasm-mode.el', and various miscellaneous improvements
1462 elsewhere.
1463
1464    Kent Boortz made the Mac OS 9 port.
1465
1466    Steve Root helped write the optimized alpha 21264 assembly code.
1467
1468    Gerardo Ballabio wrote the `gmpxx.h' C++ class interface and the C++
1469 `istream' input routines.
1470
1471    Jason Moxham rewrote `mpz_fac_ui'.
1472
1473    Pedro Gimeno implemented the Mersenne Twister and made other random
1474 number improvements.
1475
1476    Niels Mo"ller wrote the sub-quadratic GCD and extended GCD code, the
1477 quadratic Hensel division code, and (with Torbjo"rn) the new divide and
1478 conquer division code for GMP 4.3.  Niels also helped implement the new
1479 Toom multiply code for GMP 4.3 and implemented helper functions to
1480 simplify Toom evaluations for GMP 5.0.  He wrote the original version
1481 of mpn_mulmod_bnm1.
1482
1483    Alberto Zanoni and Marco Bodrato suggested the unbalanced multiply
1484 strategy, and found the optimal strategies for evaluation and
1485 interpolation in Toom multiplication.
1486
1487    Marco Bodrato helped implement the new Toom multiply code for GMP
1488 4.3 and implemented most of the new Toom multiply and squaring code for
1489 5.0.  He is the main author of the current mpn_mulmod_bnm1 and
1490 mpn_mullo_n.  Marco also wrote the functions mpn_invert and
1491 mpn_invertappr.
1492
1493    David Harvey suggested the internal function `mpn_bdiv_dbm1',
1494 implementing division relevant to Toom multiplication.  He also worked
1495 on fast assembly sequences, in particular on a fast AMD64
1496 `mpn_mul_basecase'.
1497
1498    Martin Boij wrote `mpn_perfect_power_p'.
1499
1500    (This list is chronological, not ordered after significance.  If you
1501 have contributed to GMP but are not listed above, please tell
1502 <gmp-devel@gmplib.org> about the omission!)
1503
1504    The development of floating point functions of GNU MP 2, were
1505 supported in part by the ESPRIT-BRA (Basic Research Activities) 6846
1506 project POSSO (POlynomial System SOlving).
1507
1508    The development of GMP 2, 3, and 4 was supported in part by the IDA
1509 Center for Computing Sciences.
1510
1511    Thanks go to Hans Thorsen for donating an SGI system for the GMP
1512 test system environment.
1513
1514 \1f
1515 File: gmp.info,  Node: References,  Next: GNU Free Documentation License,  Prev: Contributors,  Up: Top
1516
1517 Appendix B References
1518 *********************
1519
1520 B.1 Books
1521 =========
1522
1523    * Jonathan M. Borwein and Peter B. Borwein, "Pi and the AGM: A Study
1524      in Analytic Number Theory and Computational Complexity", Wiley,
1525      1998.
1526
1527    * Richard Crandall and Carl Pomerance, "Prime Numbers: A
1528      Computational Perspective", 2nd edition, Springer-Verlag, 2005.
1529      `http://math.dartmouth.edu/~carlp/'
1530
1531    * Henri Cohen, "A Course in Computational Algebraic Number Theory",
1532      Graduate Texts in Mathematics number 138, Springer-Verlag, 1993.
1533      `http://www.math.u-bordeaux.fr/~cohen/'
1534
1535    * Donald E. Knuth, "The Art of Computer Programming", volume 2,
1536      "Seminumerical Algorithms", 3rd edition, Addison-Wesley, 1998.
1537      `http://www-cs-faculty.stanford.edu/~knuth/taocp.html'
1538
1539    * John D. Lipson, "Elements of Algebra and Algebraic Computing", The
1540      Benjamin Cummings Publishing Company Inc, 1981.
1541
1542    * Alfred J. Menezes, Paul C. van Oorschot and Scott A. Vanstone,
1543      "Handbook of Applied Cryptography",
1544      `http://www.cacr.math.uwaterloo.ca/hac/'
1545
1546    * Richard M. Stallman and the GCC Developer Community, "Using the
1547      GNU Compiler Collection", Free Software Foundation, 2008,
1548      available online `http://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/', and in the GCC
1549      package `ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gcc/'
1550
1551 B.2 Papers
1552 ==========
1553
1554    * Yves Bertot, Nicolas Magaud and Paul Zimmermann, "A Proof of GMP
1555      Square Root", Journal of Automated Reasoning, volume 29, 2002, pp.
1556      225-252.  Also available online as INRIA Research Report 4475,
1557      June 2001, `http://www.inria.fr/rrrt/rr-4475.html'
1558
1559    * Christoph Burnikel and Joachim Ziegler, "Fast Recursive Division",
1560      Max-Planck-Institut fuer Informatik Research Report MPI-I-98-1-022,
1561      `http://data.mpi-sb.mpg.de/internet/reports.nsf/NumberView/1998-1-022'
1562
1563    * Torbjo"rn Granlund and Peter L. Montgomery, "Division by Invariant
1564      Integers using Multiplication", in Proceedings of the SIGPLAN
1565      PLDI'94 Conference, June 1994.  Also available
1566      `ftp://ftp.cwi.nl/pub/pmontgom/divcnst.psa4.gz' (and .psl.gz).
1567
1568    * Niels Mo"ller and Torbjo"rn Granlund, "Improved division by
1569      invariant integers", to appear.
1570
1571    * Torbjo"rn Granlund and Niels Mo"ller, "Division of integers large
1572      and small", to appear.
1573
1574    * Tudor Jebelean, "An algorithm for exact division", Journal of
1575      Symbolic Computation, volume 15, 1993, pp. 169-180.  Research
1576      report version available
1577      `ftp://ftp.risc.uni-linz.ac.at/pub/techreports/1992/92-35.ps.gz'
1578
1579    * Tudor Jebelean, "Exact Division with Karatsuba Complexity -
1580      Extended Abstract", RISC-Linz technical report 96-31,
1581      `ftp://ftp.risc.uni-linz.ac.at/pub/techreports/1996/96-31.ps.gz'
1582
1583    * Tudor Jebelean, "Practical Integer Division with Karatsuba
1584      Complexity", ISSAC 97, pp. 339-341.  Technical report available
1585      `ftp://ftp.risc.uni-linz.ac.at/pub/techreports/1996/96-29.ps.gz'
1586
1587    * Tudor Jebelean, "A Generalization of the Binary GCD Algorithm",
1588      ISSAC 93, pp. 111-116.  Technical report version available
1589      `ftp://ftp.risc.uni-linz.ac.at/pub/techreports/1993/93-01.ps.gz'
1590
1591    * Tudor Jebelean, "A Double-Digit Lehmer-Euclid Algorithm for
1592      Finding the GCD of Long Integers", Journal of Symbolic
1593      Computation, volume 19, 1995, pp. 145-157.  Technical report
1594      version also available
1595      `ftp://ftp.risc.uni-linz.ac.at/pub/techreports/1992/92-69.ps.gz'
1596
1597    * Werner Krandick and Tudor Jebelean, "Bidirectional Exact Integer
1598      Division", Journal of Symbolic Computation, volume 21, 1996, pp.
1599      441-455.  Early technical report version also available
1600      `ftp://ftp.risc.uni-linz.ac.at/pub/techreports/1994/94-50.ps.gz'
1601
1602    * Makoto Matsumoto and Takuji Nishimura, "Mersenne Twister: A
1603      623-dimensionally equidistributed uniform pseudorandom number
1604      generator", ACM Transactions on Modelling and Computer Simulation,
1605      volume 8, January 1998, pp. 3-30.  Available online
1606      `http://www.math.sci.hiroshima-u.ac.jp/~m-mat/MT/ARTICLES/mt.ps.gz'
1607      (or .pdf)
1608
1609    * R. Moenck and A. Borodin, "Fast Modular Transforms via Division",
1610      Proceedings of the 13th Annual IEEE Symposium on Switching and
1611      Automata Theory, October 1972, pp. 90-96.  Reprinted as "Fast
1612      Modular Transforms", Journal of Computer and System Sciences,
1613      volume 8, number 3, June 1974, pp. 366-386.
1614
1615    * Niels Mo"ller, "On Scho"nhage's algorithm and subquadratic integer
1616      GCD   computation", in Mathematics of Computation, volume 77,
1617      January 2008, pp.    589-607.
1618
1619    * Peter L. Montgomery, "Modular Multiplication Without Trial
1620      Division", in Mathematics of Computation, volume 44, number 170,
1621      April 1985.
1622
1623    * Arnold Scho"nhage and Volker Strassen, "Schnelle Multiplikation
1624      grosser Zahlen", Computing 7, 1971, pp. 281-292.
1625
1626    * Kenneth Weber, "The accelerated integer GCD algorithm", ACM
1627      Transactions on Mathematical Software, volume 21, number 1, March
1628      1995, pp. 111-122.
1629
1630    * Paul Zimmermann, "Karatsuba Square Root", INRIA Research Report
1631      3805, November 1999, `http://www.inria.fr/rrrt/rr-3805.html'
1632
1633    * Paul Zimmermann, "A Proof of GMP Fast Division and Square Root
1634      Implementations",
1635      `http://www.loria.fr/~zimmerma/papers/proof-div-sqrt.ps.gz'
1636
1637    * Dan Zuras, "On Squaring and Multiplying Large Integers", ARITH-11:
1638      IEEE Symposium on Computer Arithmetic, 1993, pp. 260 to 271.
1639      Reprinted as "More on Multiplying and Squaring Large Integers",
1640      IEEE Transactions on Computers, volume 43, number 8, August 1994,
1641      pp. 899-908.
1642
1643 \1f
1644 File: gmp.info,  Node: GNU Free Documentation License,  Next: Concept Index,  Prev: References,  Up: Top
1645
1646 Appendix C GNU Free Documentation License
1647 *****************************************
1648
1649                      Version 1.3, 3 November 2008
1650
1651      Copyright (C) 2000, 2001, 2002, 2007, 2008 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
1652      `http://fsf.org/'
1653
1654      Everyone is permitted to copy and distribute verbatim copies
1655      of this license document, but changing it is not allowed.
1656
1657   0. PREAMBLE
1658
1659      The purpose of this License is to make a manual, textbook, or other
1660      functional and useful document "free" in the sense of freedom: to
1661      assure everyone the effective freedom to copy and redistribute it,
1662      with or without modifying it, either commercially or
1663      noncommercially.  Secondarily, this License preserves for the
1664      author and publisher a way to get credit for their work, while not
1665      being considered responsible for modifications made by others.
1666
1667      This License is a kind of "copyleft", which means that derivative
1668      works of the document must themselves be free in the same sense.
1669      It complements the GNU General Public License, which is a copyleft
1670      license designed for free software.
1671
1672      We have designed this License in order to use it for manuals for
1673      free software, because free software needs free documentation: a
1674      free program should come with manuals providing the same freedoms
1675      that the software does.  But this License is not limited to
1676      software manuals; it can be used for any textual work, regardless
1677      of subject matter or whether it is published as a printed book.
1678      We recommend this License principally for works whose purpose is
1679      instruction or reference.
1680
1681   1. APPLICABILITY AND DEFINITIONS
1682
1683      This License applies to any manual or other work, in any medium,
1684      that contains a notice placed by the copyright holder saying it
1685      can be distributed under the terms of this License.  Such a notice
1686      grants a world-wide, royalty-free license, unlimited in duration,
1687      to use that work under the conditions stated herein.  The
1688      "Document", below, refers to any such manual or work.  Any member
1689      of the public is a licensee, and is addressed as "you".  You
1690      accept the license if you copy, modify or distribute the work in a
1691      way requiring permission under copyright law.
1692
1693      A "Modified Version" of the Document means any work containing the
1694      Document or a portion of it, either copied verbatim, or with
1695      modifications and/or translated into another language.
1696
1697      A "Secondary Section" is a named appendix or a front-matter section
1698      of the Document that deals exclusively with the relationship of the
1699      publishers or authors of the Document to the Document's overall
1700      subject (or to related matters) and contains nothing that could
1701      fall directly within that overall subject.  (Thus, if the Document
1702      is in part a textbook of mathematics, a Secondary Section may not
1703      explain any mathematics.)  The relationship could be a matter of
1704      historical connection with the subject or with related matters, or
1705      of legal, commercial, philosophical, ethical or political position
1706      regarding them.
1707
1708      The "Invariant Sections" are certain Secondary Sections whose
1709      titles are designated, as being those of Invariant Sections, in
1710      the notice that says that the Document is released under this
1711      License.  If a section does not fit the above definition of
1712      Secondary then it is not allowed to be designated as Invariant.
1713      The Document may contain zero Invariant Sections.  If the Document
1714      does not identify any Invariant Sections then there are none.
1715
1716      The "Cover Texts" are certain short passages of text that are
1717      listed, as Front-Cover Texts or Back-Cover Texts, in the notice
1718      that says that the Document is released under this License.  A
1719      Front-Cover Text may be at most 5 words, and a Back-Cover Text may
1720      be at most 25 words.
1721
1722      A "Transparent" copy of the Document means a machine-readable copy,
1723      represented in a format whose specification is available to the
1724      general public, that is suitable for revising the document
1725      straightforwardly with generic text editors or (for images
1726      composed of pixels) generic paint programs or (for drawings) some
1727      widely available drawing editor, and that is suitable for input to
1728      text formatters or for automatic translation to a variety of
1729      formats suitable for input to text formatters.  A copy made in an
1730      otherwise Transparent file format whose markup, or absence of
1731      markup, has been arranged to thwart or discourage subsequent
1732      modification by readers is not Transparent.  An image format is
1733      not Transparent if used for any substantial amount of text.  A
1734      copy that is not "Transparent" is called "Opaque".
1735
1736      Examples of suitable formats for Transparent copies include plain
1737      ASCII without markup, Texinfo input format, LaTeX input format,
1738      SGML or XML using a publicly available DTD, and
1739      standard-conforming simple HTML, PostScript or PDF designed for
1740      human modification.  Examples of transparent image formats include
1741      PNG, XCF and JPG.  Opaque formats include proprietary formats that
1742      can be read and edited only by proprietary word processors, SGML or
1743      XML for which the DTD and/or processing tools are not generally
1744      available, and the machine-generated HTML, PostScript or PDF
1745      produced by some word processors for output purposes only.
1746
1747      The "Title Page" means, for a printed book, the title page itself,
1748      plus such following pages as are needed to hold, legibly, the
1749      material this License requires to appear in the title page.  For
1750      works in formats which do not have any title page as such, "Title
1751      Page" means the text near the most prominent appearance of the
1752      work's title, preceding the beginning of the body of the text.
1753
1754      The "publisher" means any person or entity that distributes copies
1755      of the Document to the public.
1756
1757      A section "Entitled XYZ" means a named subunit of the Document
1758      whose title either is precisely XYZ or contains XYZ in parentheses
1759      following text that translates XYZ in another language.  (Here XYZ
1760      stands for a specific section name mentioned below, such as
1761      "Acknowledgements", "Dedications", "Endorsements", or "History".)
1762      To "Preserve the Title" of such a section when you modify the
1763      Document means that it remains a section "Entitled XYZ" according
1764      to this definition.
1765
1766      The Document may include Warranty Disclaimers next to the notice
1767      which states that this License applies to the Document.  These
1768      Warranty Disclaimers are considered to be included by reference in
1769      this License, but only as regards disclaiming warranties: any other
1770      implication that these Warranty Disclaimers may have is void and
1771      has no effect on the meaning of this License.
1772
1773   2. VERBATIM COPYING
1774
1775      You may copy and distribute the Document in any medium, either
1776      commercially or noncommercially, provided that this License, the
1777      copyright notices, and the license notice saying this License
1778      applies to the Document are reproduced in all copies, and that you
1779      add no other conditions whatsoever to those of this License.  You
1780      may not use technical measures to obstruct or control the reading
1781      or further copying of the copies you make or distribute.  However,
1782      you may accept compensation in exchange for copies.  If you
1783      distribute a large enough number of copies you must also follow
1784      the conditions in section 3.
1785
1786      You may also lend copies, under the same conditions stated above,
1787      and you may publicly display copies.
1788
1789   3. COPYING IN QUANTITY
1790
1791      If you publish printed copies (or copies in media that commonly
1792      have printed covers) of the Document, numbering more than 100, and
1793      the Document's license notice requires Cover Texts, you must
1794      enclose the copies in covers that carry, clearly and legibly, all
1795      these Cover Texts: Front-Cover Texts on the front cover, and
1796      Back-Cover Texts on the back cover.  Both covers must also clearly
1797      and legibly identify you as the publisher of these copies.  The
1798      front cover must present the full title with all words of the
1799      title equally prominent and visible.  You may add other material
1800      on the covers in addition.  Copying with changes limited to the
1801      covers, as long as they preserve the title of the Document and
1802      satisfy these conditions, can be treated as verbatim copying in
1803      other respects.
1804
1805      If the required texts for either cover are too voluminous to fit
1806      legibly, you should put the first ones listed (as many as fit
1807      reasonably) on the actual cover, and continue the rest onto
1808      adjacent pages.
1809
1810      If you publish or distribute Opaque copies of the Document
1811      numbering more than 100, you must either include a
1812      machine-readable Transparent copy along with each Opaque copy, or
1813      state in or with each Opaque copy a computer-network location from
1814      which the general network-using public has access to download
1815      using public-standard network protocols a complete Transparent
1816      copy of the Document, free of added material.  If you use the
1817      latter option, you must take reasonably prudent steps, when you
1818      begin distribution of Opaque copies in quantity, to ensure that
1819      this Transparent copy will remain thus accessible at the stated
1820      location until at least one year after the last time you
1821      distribute an Opaque copy (directly or through your agents or
1822      retailers) of that edition to the public.
1823
1824      It is requested, but not required, that you contact the authors of
1825      the Document well before redistributing any large number of
1826      copies, to give them a chance to provide you with an updated
1827      version of the Document.
1828
1829   4. MODIFICATIONS
1830
1831      You may copy and distribute a Modified Version of the Document
1832      under the conditions of sections 2 and 3 above, provided that you
1833      release the Modified Version under precisely this License, with
1834      the Modified Version filling the role of the Document, thus
1835      licensing distribution and modification of the Modified Version to
1836      whoever possesses a copy of it.  In addition, you must do these
1837      things in the Modified Version:
1838
1839        A. Use in the Title Page (and on the covers, if any) a title
1840           distinct from that of the Document, and from those of
1841           previous versions (which should, if there were any, be listed
1842           in the History section of the Document).  You may use the
1843           same title as a previous version if the original publisher of
1844           that version gives permission.
1845
1846        B. List on the Title Page, as authors, one or more persons or
1847           entities responsible for authorship of the modifications in
1848           the Modified Version, together with at least five of the
1849           principal authors of the Document (all of its principal
1850           authors, if it has fewer than five), unless they release you
1851           from this requirement.
1852
1853        C. State on the Title page the name of the publisher of the
1854           Modified Version, as the publisher.
1855
1856        D. Preserve all the copyright notices of the Document.
1857
1858        E. Add an appropriate copyright notice for your modifications
1859           adjacent to the other copyright notices.
1860
1861        F. Include, immediately after the copyright notices, a license
1862           notice giving the public permission to use the Modified
1863           Version under the terms of this License, in the form shown in
1864           the Addendum below.
1865
1866        G. Preserve in that license notice the full lists of Invariant
1867           Sections and required Cover Texts given in the Document's
1868           license notice.
1869
1870        H. Include an unaltered copy of this License.
1871
1872        I. Preserve the section Entitled "History", Preserve its Title,
1873           and add to it an item stating at least the title, year, new
1874           authors, and publisher of the Modified Version as given on
1875           the Title Page.  If there is no section Entitled "History" in
1876           the Document, create one stating the title, year, authors,
1877           and publisher of the Document as given on its Title Page,
1878           then add an item describing the Modified Version as stated in
1879           the previous sentence.
1880
1881        J. Preserve the network location, if any, given in the Document
1882           for public access to a Transparent copy of the Document, and
1883           likewise the network locations given in the Document for
1884           previous versions it was based on.  These may be placed in
1885           the "History" section.  You may omit a network location for a
1886           work that was published at least four years before the
1887           Document itself, or if the original publisher of the version
1888           it refers to gives permission.
1889
1890        K. For any section Entitled "Acknowledgements" or "Dedications",
1891           Preserve the Title of the section, and preserve in the
1892           section all the substance and tone of each of the contributor
1893           acknowledgements and/or dedications given therein.
1894
1895        L. Preserve all the Invariant Sections of the Document,
1896           unaltered in their text and in their titles.  Section numbers
1897           or the equivalent are not considered part of the section
1898           titles.
1899
1900        M. Delete any section Entitled "Endorsements".  Such a section
1901           may not be included in the Modified Version.
1902
1903        N. Do not retitle any existing section to be Entitled
1904           "Endorsements" or to conflict in title with any Invariant
1905           Section.
1906
1907        O. Preserve any Warranty Disclaimers.
1908
1909      If the Modified Version includes new front-matter sections or
1910      appendices that qualify as Secondary Sections and contain no
1911      material copied from the Document, you may at your option
1912      designate some or all of these sections as invariant.  To do this,
1913      add their titles to the list of Invariant Sections in the Modified
1914      Version's license notice.  These titles must be distinct from any
1915      other section titles.
1916
1917      You may add a section Entitled "Endorsements", provided it contains
1918      nothing but endorsements of your Modified Version by various
1919      parties--for example, statements of peer review or that the text
1920      has been approved by an organization as the authoritative
1921      definition of a standard.
1922
1923      You may add a passage of up to five words as a Front-Cover Text,
1924      and a passage of up to 25 words as a Back-Cover Text, to the end
1925      of the list of Cover Texts in the Modified Version.  Only one
1926      passage of Front-Cover Text and one of Back-Cover Text may be
1927      added by (or through arrangements made by) any one entity.  If the
1928      Document already includes a cover text for the same cover,
1929      previously added by you or by arrangement made by the same entity
1930      you are acting on behalf of, you may not add another; but you may
1931      replace the old one, on explicit permission from the previous
1932      publisher that added the old one.
1933
1934      The author(s) and publisher(s) of the Document do not by this
1935      License give permission to use their names for publicity for or to
1936      assert or imply endorsement of any Modified Version.
1937
1938   5. COMBINING DOCUMENTS
1939
1940      You may combine the Document with other documents released under
1941      this License, under the terms defined in section 4 above for
1942      modified versions, provided that you include in the combination
1943      all of the Invariant Sections of all of the original documents,
1944      unmodified, and list them all as Invariant Sections of your
1945      combined work in its license notice, and that you preserve all
1946      their Warranty Disclaimers.
1947
1948      The combined work need only contain one copy of this License, and
1949      multiple identical Invariant Sections may be replaced with a single
1950      copy.  If there are multiple Invariant Sections with the same name
1951      but different contents, make the title of each such section unique
1952      by adding at the end of it, in parentheses, the name of the
1953      original author or publisher of that section if known, or else a
1954      unique number.  Make the same adjustment to the section titles in
1955      the list of Invariant Sections in the license notice of the
1956      combined work.
1957
1958      In the combination, you must combine any sections Entitled
1959      "History" in the various original documents, forming one section
1960      Entitled "History"; likewise combine any sections Entitled
1961      "Acknowledgements", and any sections Entitled "Dedications".  You
1962      must delete all sections Entitled "Endorsements."
1963
1964   6. COLLECTIONS OF DOCUMENTS
1965
1966      You may make a collection consisting of the Document and other
1967      documents released under this License, and replace the individual
1968      copies of this License in the various documents with a single copy
1969      that is included in the collection, provided that you follow the
1970      rules of this License for verbatim copying of each of the
1971      documents in all other respects.
1972
1973      You may extract a single document from such a collection, and
1974      distribute it individually under this License, provided you insert
1975      a copy of this License into the extracted document, and follow
1976      this License in all other respects regarding verbatim copying of
1977      that document.
1978
1979   7. AGGREGATION WITH INDEPENDENT WORKS
1980
1981      A compilation of the Document or its derivatives with other
1982      separate and independent documents or works, in or on a volume of
1983      a storage or distribution medium, is called an "aggregate" if the
1984      copyright resulting from the compilation is not used to limit the
1985      legal rights of the compilation's users beyond what the individual
1986      works permit.  When the Document is included in an aggregate, this
1987      License does not apply to the other works in the aggregate which
1988      are not themselves derivative works of the Document.
1989
1990      If the Cover Text requirement of section 3 is applicable to these
1991      copies of the Document, then if the Document is less than one half
1992      of the entire aggregate, the Document's Cover Texts may be placed
1993      on covers that bracket the Document within the aggregate, or the
1994      electronic equivalent of covers if the Document is in electronic
1995      form.  Otherwise they must appear on printed covers that bracket
1996      the whole aggregate.
1997
1998   8. TRANSLATION
1999
2000      Translation is considered a kind of modification, so you may
2001      distribute translations of the Document under the terms of section
2002      4.  Replacing Invariant Sections with translations requires special
2003      permission from their copyright holders, but you may include
2004      translations of some or all Invariant Sections in addition to the
2005      original versions of these Invariant Sections.  You may include a
2006      translation of this License, and all the license notices in the
2007      Document, and any Warranty Disclaimers, provided that you also
2008      include the original English version of this License and the
2009      original versions of those notices and disclaimers.  In case of a
2010      disagreement between the translation and the original version of
2011      this License or a notice or disclaimer, the original version will
2012      prevail.
2013
2014      If a section in the Document is Entitled "Acknowledgements",
2015      "Dedications", or "History", the requirement (section 4) to
2016      Preserve its Title (section 1) will typically require changing the
2017      actual title.
2018
2019   9. TERMINATION
2020
2021      You may not copy, modify, sublicense, or distribute the Document
2022      except as expressly provided under this License.  Any attempt
2023      otherwise to copy, modify, sublicense, or distribute it is void,
2024      and will automatically terminate your rights under this License.
2025
2026      However, if you cease all violation of this License, then your
2027      license from a particular copyright holder is reinstated (a)
2028      provisionally, unless and until the copyright holder explicitly
2029      and finally terminates your license, and (b) permanently, if the
2030      copyright holder fails to notify you of the violation by some
2031      reasonable means prior to 60 days after the cessation.
2032
2033      Moreover, your license from a particular copyright holder is
2034      reinstated permanently if the copyright holder notifies you of the
2035      violation by some reasonable means, this is the first time you have
2036      received notice of violation of this License (for any work) from
2037      that copyright holder, and you cure the violation prior to 30 days
2038      after your receipt of the notice.
2039
2040      Termination of your rights under this section does not terminate
2041      the licenses of parties who have received copies or rights from
2042      you under this License.  If your rights have been terminated and
2043      not permanently reinstated, receipt of a copy of some or all of
2044      the same material does not give you any rights to use it.
2045
2046  10. FUTURE REVISIONS OF THIS LICENSE
2047
2048      The Free Software Foundation may publish new, revised versions of
2049      the GNU Free Documentation License from time to time.  Such new
2050      versions will be similar in spirit to the present version, but may
2051      differ in detail to address new problems or concerns.  See
2052      `http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/'.
2053
2054      Each version of the License is given a distinguishing version
2055      number.  If the Document specifies that a particular numbered
2056      version of this License "or any later version" applies to it, you
2057      have the option of following the terms and conditions either of
2058      that specified version or of any later version that has been
2059      published (not as a draft) by the Free Software Foundation.  If
2060      the Document does not specify a version number of this License,
2061      you may choose any version ever published (not as a draft) by the
2062      Free Software Foundation.  If the Document specifies that a proxy
2063      can decide which future versions of this License can be used, that
2064      proxy's public statement of acceptance of a version permanently
2065      authorizes you to choose that version for the Document.
2066
2067  11. RELICENSING
2068
2069      "Massive Multiauthor Collaboration Site" (or "MMC Site") means any
2070      World Wide Web server that publishes copyrightable works and also
2071      provides prominent facilities for anybody to edit those works.  A
2072      public wiki that anybody can edit is an example of such a server.
2073      A "Massive Multiauthor Collaboration" (or "MMC") contained in the
2074      site means any set of copyrightable works thus published on the MMC
2075      site.
2076
2077      "CC-BY-SA" means the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0
2078      license published by Creative Commons Corporation, a not-for-profit
2079      corporation with a principal place of business in San Francisco,
2080      California, as well as future copyleft versions of that license
2081      published by that same organization.
2082
2083      "Incorporate" means to publish or republish a Document, in whole or
2084      in part, as part of another Document.
2085
2086      An MMC is "eligible for relicensing" if it is licensed under this
2087      License, and if all works that were first published under this
2088      License somewhere other than this MMC, and subsequently
2089      incorporated in whole or in part into the MMC, (1) had no cover
2090      texts or invariant sections, and (2) were thus incorporated prior
2091      to November 1, 2008.
2092
2093      The operator of an MMC Site may republish an MMC contained in the
2094      site under CC-BY-SA on the same site at any time before August 1,
2095      2009, provided the MMC is eligible for relicensing.
2096
2097
2098 ADDENDUM: How to use this License for your documents
2099 ====================================================
2100
2101 To use this License in a document you have written, include a copy of
2102 the License in the document and put the following copyright and license
2103 notices just after the title page:
2104
2105        Copyright (C)  YEAR  YOUR NAME.
2106        Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document
2107        under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.3
2108        or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation;
2109        with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover
2110        Texts.  A copy of the license is included in the section entitled ``GNU
2111        Free Documentation License''.
2112
2113    If you have Invariant Sections, Front-Cover Texts and Back-Cover
2114 Texts, replace the "with...Texts." line with this:
2115
2116          with the Invariant Sections being LIST THEIR TITLES, with
2117          the Front-Cover Texts being LIST, and with the Back-Cover Texts
2118          being LIST.
2119
2120    If you have Invariant Sections without Cover Texts, or some other
2121 combination of the three, merge those two alternatives to suit the
2122 situation.
2123
2124    If your document contains nontrivial examples of program code, we
2125 recommend releasing these examples in parallel under your choice of
2126 free software license, such as the GNU General Public License, to
2127 permit their use in free software.
2128
2129 \1f
2130 File: gmp.info,  Node: Concept Index,  Next: Function Index,  Prev: GNU Free Documentation License,  Up: Top
2131
2132 Concept Index
2133 *************
2134
2135 \0\b[index\0\b]
2136 * Menu:
2137
2138 * #include:                              Headers and Libraries.
2139                                                               (line   6)
2140 * --build:                               Build Options.       (line  52)
2141 * --disable-fft:                         Build Options.       (line 317)
2142 * --disable-shared:                      Build Options.       (line  45)
2143 * --disable-static:                      Build Options.       (line  45)
2144 * --enable-alloca:                       Build Options.       (line 278)
2145 * --enable-assert:                       Build Options.       (line 327)
2146 * --enable-cxx:                          Build Options.       (line 230)
2147 * --enable-fat:                          Build Options.       (line 164)
2148 * --enable-mpbsd:                        Build Options.       (line 322)
2149 * --enable-profiling <1>:                Profiling.           (line   6)
2150 * --enable-profiling:                    Build Options.       (line 331)
2151 * --exec-prefix:                         Build Options.       (line  32)
2152 * --host:                                Build Options.       (line  66)
2153 * --prefix:                              Build Options.       (line  32)
2154 * -finstrument-functions:                Profiling.           (line  66)
2155 * 2exp functions:                        Efficiency.          (line  43)
2156 * 68000:                                 Notes for Particular Systems.
2157                                                               (line  80)
2158 * 80x86:                                 Notes for Particular Systems.
2159                                                               (line 126)
2160 * ABI <1>:                               Build Options.       (line 171)
2161 * ABI:                                   ABI and ISA.         (line   6)
2162 * About this manual:                     Introduction to GMP. (line  58)
2163 * AC_CHECK_LIB:                          Autoconf.            (line  11)
2164 * AIX <1>:                               ABI and ISA.         (line 184)
2165 * AIX <2>:                               Notes for Particular Systems.
2166                                                               (line   7)
2167 * AIX:                                   ABI and ISA.         (line 169)
2168 * Algorithms:                            Algorithms.          (line   6)
2169 * alloca:                                Build Options.       (line 278)
2170 * Allocation of memory:                  Custom Allocation.   (line   6)
2171 * AMD64:                                 ABI and ISA.         (line  44)
2172 * Anonymous FTP of latest version:       Introduction to GMP. (line  38)
2173 * Application Binary Interface:          ABI and ISA.         (line   6)
2174 * Arithmetic functions <1>:              Float Arithmetic.    (line   6)
2175 * Arithmetic functions <2>:              Integer Arithmetic.  (line   6)
2176 * Arithmetic functions:                  Rational Arithmetic. (line   6)
2177 * ARM:                                   Notes for Particular Systems.
2178                                                               (line  20)
2179 * Assembly cache handling:               Assembly Cache Handling.
2180                                                               (line   6)
2181 * Assembly carry propagation:            Assembly Carry Propagation.
2182                                                               (line   6)
2183 * Assembly code organisation:            Assembly Code Organisation.
2184                                                               (line   6)
2185 * Assembly coding:                       Assembly Coding.     (line   6)
2186 * Assembly floating Point:               Assembly Floating Point.
2187                                                               (line   6)
2188 * Assembly loop unrolling:               Assembly Loop Unrolling.
2189                                                               (line   6)
2190 * Assembly SIMD:                         Assembly SIMD Instructions.
2191                                                               (line   6)
2192 * Assembly software pipelining:          Assembly Software Pipelining.
2193                                                               (line   6)
2194 * Assembly writing guide:                Assembly Writing Guide.
2195                                                               (line   6)
2196 * Assertion checking <1>:                Debugging.           (line  79)
2197 * Assertion checking:                    Build Options.       (line 327)
2198 * Assignment functions <1>:              Assigning Floats.    (line   6)
2199 * Assignment functions <2>:              Initializing Rationals.
2200                                                               (line   6)
2201 * Assignment functions <3>:              Simultaneous Integer Init & Assign.
2202                                                               (line   6)
2203 * Assignment functions <4>:              Simultaneous Float Init & Assign.
2204                                                               (line   6)
2205 * Assignment functions:                  Assigning Integers.  (line   6)
2206 * Autoconf:                              Autoconf.            (line   6)
2207 * Basics:                                GMP Basics.          (line   6)
2208 * Berkeley MP compatible functions <1>:  Build Options.       (line 322)
2209 * Berkeley MP compatible functions:      BSD Compatible Functions.
2210                                                               (line   6)
2211 * Binomial coefficient algorithm:        Binomial Coefficients Algorithm.
2212                                                               (line   6)
2213 * Binomial coefficient functions:        Number Theoretic Functions.
2214                                                               (line 100)
2215 * Binutils strip:                        Known Build Problems.
2216                                                               (line  28)
2217 * Bit manipulation functions:            Integer Logic and Bit Fiddling.
2218                                                               (line   6)
2219 * Bit scanning functions:                Integer Logic and Bit Fiddling.
2220                                                               (line  38)
2221 * Bit shift left:                        Integer Arithmetic.  (line  35)
2222 * Bit shift right:                       Integer Division.    (line  53)
2223 * Bits per limb:                         Useful Macros and Constants.
2224                                                               (line   7)
2225 * BSD MP compatible functions <1>:       Build Options.       (line 322)
2226 * BSD MP compatible functions:           BSD Compatible Functions.
2227                                                               (line   6)
2228 * Bug reporting:                         Reporting Bugs.      (line   6)
2229 * Build directory:                       Build Options.       (line  19)
2230 * Build notes for binary packaging:      Notes for Package Builds.
2231                                                               (line   6)
2232 * Build notes for particular systems:    Notes for Particular Systems.
2233                                                               (line   6)
2234 * Build options:                         Build Options.       (line   6)
2235 * Build problems known:                  Known Build Problems.
2236                                                               (line   6)
2237 * Build system:                          Build Options.       (line  52)
2238 * Building GMP:                          Installing GMP.      (line   6)
2239 * Bus error:                             Debugging.           (line   7)
2240 * C compiler:                            Build Options.       (line 182)
2241 * C++ compiler:                          Build Options.       (line 254)
2242 * C++ interface:                         C++ Class Interface. (line   6)
2243 * C++ interface internals:               C++ Interface Internals.
2244                                                               (line   6)
2245 * C++ istream input:                     C++ Formatted Input. (line   6)
2246 * C++ ostream output:                    C++ Formatted Output.
2247                                                               (line   6)
2248 * C++ support:                           Build Options.       (line 230)
2249 * CC:                                    Build Options.       (line 182)
2250 * CC_FOR_BUILD:                          Build Options.       (line 217)
2251 * CFLAGS:                                Build Options.       (line 182)
2252 * Checker:                               Debugging.           (line 115)
2253 * checkergcc:                            Debugging.           (line 122)
2254 * Code organisation:                     Assembly Code Organisation.
2255                                                               (line   6)
2256 * Compaq C++:                            Notes for Particular Systems.
2257                                                               (line  25)
2258 * Comparison functions <1>:              Integer Comparisons. (line   6)
2259 * Comparison functions <2>:              Comparing Rationals. (line   6)
2260 * Comparison functions:                  Float Comparison.    (line   6)
2261 * Compatibility with older versions:     Compatibility with older versions.
2262                                                               (line   6)
2263 * Conditions for copying GNU MP:         Copying.             (line   6)
2264 * Configuring GMP:                       Installing GMP.      (line   6)
2265 * Congruence algorithm:                  Exact Remainder.     (line  29)
2266 * Congruence functions:                  Integer Division.    (line 124)
2267 * Constants:                             Useful Macros and Constants.
2268                                                               (line   6)
2269 * Contributors:                          Contributors.        (line   6)
2270 * Conventions for parameters:            Parameter Conventions.
2271                                                               (line   6)
2272 * Conventions for variables:             Variable Conventions.
2273                                                               (line   6)
2274 * Conversion functions <1>:              Converting Integers. (line   6)
2275 * Conversion functions <2>:              Converting Floats.   (line   6)
2276 * Conversion functions:                  Rational Conversions.
2277                                                               (line   6)
2278 * Copying conditions:                    Copying.             (line   6)
2279 * CPPFLAGS:                              Build Options.       (line 208)
2280 * CPU types <1>:                         Introduction to GMP. (line  24)
2281 * CPU types:                             Build Options.       (line 108)
2282 * Cross compiling:                       Build Options.       (line  66)
2283 * Custom allocation:                     Custom Allocation.   (line   6)
2284 * CXX:                                   Build Options.       (line 254)
2285 * CXXFLAGS:                              Build Options.       (line 254)
2286 * Cygwin:                                Notes for Particular Systems.
2287                                                               (line  43)
2288 * Darwin:                                Known Build Problems.
2289                                                               (line  51)
2290 * Debugging:                             Debugging.           (line   6)
2291 * Demonstration programs:                Demonstration Programs.
2292                                                               (line   6)
2293 * Digits in an integer:                  Miscellaneous Integer Functions.
2294                                                               (line  23)
2295 * Divisibility algorithm:                Exact Remainder.     (line  29)
2296 * Divisibility functions:                Integer Division.    (line 124)
2297 * Divisibility testing:                  Efficiency.          (line  91)
2298 * Division algorithms:                   Division Algorithms. (line   6)
2299 * Division functions <1>:                Rational Arithmetic. (line  22)
2300 * Division functions <2>:                Integer Division.    (line   6)
2301 * Division functions:                    Float Arithmetic.    (line  33)
2302 * DJGPP <1>:                             Notes for Particular Systems.
2303                                                               (line  43)
2304 * DJGPP:                                 Known Build Problems.
2305                                                               (line  18)
2306 * DLLs:                                  Notes for Particular Systems.
2307                                                               (line  56)
2308 * DocBook:                               Build Options.       (line 354)
2309 * Documentation formats:                 Build Options.       (line 347)
2310 * Documentation license:                 GNU Free Documentation License.
2311                                                               (line   6)
2312 * DVI:                                   Build Options.       (line 350)
2313 * Efficiency:                            Efficiency.          (line   6)
2314 * Emacs:                                 Emacs.               (line   6)
2315 * Exact division functions:              Integer Division.    (line 102)
2316 * Exact remainder:                       Exact Remainder.     (line   6)
2317 * Example programs:                      Demonstration Programs.
2318                                                               (line   6)
2319 * Exec prefix:                           Build Options.       (line  32)
2320 * Execution profiling <1>:               Profiling.           (line   6)
2321 * Execution profiling:                   Build Options.       (line 331)
2322 * Exponentiation functions <1>:          Integer Exponentiation.
2323                                                               (line   6)
2324 * Exponentiation functions:              Float Arithmetic.    (line  41)
2325 * Export:                                Integer Import and Export.
2326                                                               (line  45)
2327 * Expression parsing demo:               Demonstration Programs.
2328                                                               (line  18)
2329 * Extended GCD:                          Number Theoretic Functions.
2330                                                               (line  45)
2331 * Factor removal functions:              Number Theoretic Functions.
2332                                                               (line  90)
2333 * Factorial algorithm:                   Factorial Algorithm. (line   6)
2334 * Factorial functions:                   Number Theoretic Functions.
2335                                                               (line  95)
2336 * Factorization demo:                    Demonstration Programs.
2337                                                               (line  25)
2338 * Fast Fourier Transform:                FFT Multiplication.  (line   6)
2339 * Fat binary:                            Build Options.       (line 164)
2340 * FFT multiplication <1>:                FFT Multiplication.  (line   6)
2341 * FFT multiplication:                    Build Options.       (line 317)
2342 * Fibonacci number algorithm:            Fibonacci Numbers Algorithm.
2343                                                               (line   6)
2344 * Fibonacci sequence functions:          Number Theoretic Functions.
2345                                                               (line 108)
2346 * Float arithmetic functions:            Float Arithmetic.    (line   6)
2347 * Float assignment functions <1>:        Simultaneous Float Init & Assign.
2348                                                               (line   6)
2349 * Float assignment functions:            Assigning Floats.    (line   6)
2350 * Float comparison functions:            Float Comparison.    (line   6)
2351 * Float conversion functions:            Converting Floats.   (line   6)
2352 * Float functions:                       Floating-point Functions.
2353                                                               (line   6)
2354 * Float initialization functions <1>:    Simultaneous Float Init & Assign.
2355                                                               (line   6)
2356 * Float initialization functions:        Initializing Floats. (line   6)
2357 * Float input and output functions:      I/O of Floats.       (line   6)
2358 * Float internals:                       Float Internals.     (line   6)
2359 * Float miscellaneous functions:         Miscellaneous Float Functions.
2360                                                               (line   6)
2361 * Float random number functions:         Miscellaneous Float Functions.
2362                                                               (line  27)
2363 * Float rounding functions:              Miscellaneous Float Functions.
2364                                                               (line   9)
2365 * Float sign tests:                      Float Comparison.    (line  33)
2366 * Floating point mode:                   Notes for Particular Systems.
2367                                                               (line  34)
2368 * Floating-point functions:              Floating-point Functions.
2369                                                               (line   6)
2370 * Floating-point number:                 Nomenclature and Types.
2371                                                               (line  21)
2372 * fnccheck:                              Profiling.           (line  77)
2373 * Formatted input:                       Formatted Input.     (line   6)
2374 * Formatted output:                      Formatted Output.    (line   6)
2375 * Free Documentation License:            GNU Free Documentation License.
2376                                                               (line   6)
2377 * frexp <1>:                             Converting Floats.   (line  23)
2378 * frexp:                                 Converting Integers. (line  42)
2379 * FTP of latest version:                 Introduction to GMP. (line  38)
2380 * Function classes:                      Function Classes.    (line   6)
2381 * FunctionCheck:                         Profiling.           (line  77)
2382 * GCC Checker:                           Debugging.           (line 115)
2383 * GCD algorithms:                        Greatest Common Divisor Algorithms.
2384                                                               (line   6)
2385 * GCD extended:                          Number Theoretic Functions.
2386                                                               (line  45)
2387 * GCD functions:                         Number Theoretic Functions.
2388                                                               (line  30)
2389 * GDB:                                   Debugging.           (line  58)
2390 * Generic C:                             Build Options.       (line 153)
2391 * GMP Perl module:                       Demonstration Programs.
2392                                                               (line  35)
2393 * GMP version number:                    Useful Macros and Constants.
2394                                                               (line  12)
2395 * gmp.h:                                 Headers and Libraries.
2396                                                               (line   6)
2397 * gmpxx.h:                               C++ Interface General.
2398                                                               (line   8)
2399 * GNU Debugger:                          Debugging.           (line  58)
2400 * GNU Free Documentation License:        GNU Free Documentation License.
2401                                                               (line   6)
2402 * GNU strip:                             Known Build Problems.
2403                                                               (line  28)
2404 * gprof:                                 Profiling.           (line  41)
2405 * Greatest common divisor algorithms:    Greatest Common Divisor Algorithms.
2406                                                               (line   6)
2407 * Greatest common divisor functions:     Number Theoretic Functions.
2408                                                               (line  30)
2409 * Hardware floating point mode:          Notes for Particular Systems.
2410                                                               (line  34)
2411 * Headers:                               Headers and Libraries.
2412                                                               (line   6)
2413 * Heap problems:                         Debugging.           (line  24)
2414 * Home page:                             Introduction to GMP. (line  34)
2415 * Host system:                           Build Options.       (line  66)
2416 * HP-UX:                                 ABI and ISA.         (line 107)
2417 * HPPA:                                  ABI and ISA.         (line  68)
2418 * I/O functions <1>:                     I/O of Integers.     (line   6)
2419 * I/O functions <2>:                     I/O of Rationals.    (line   6)
2420 * I/O functions:                         I/O of Floats.       (line   6)
2421 * i386:                                  Notes for Particular Systems.
2422                                                               (line 126)
2423 * IA-64:                                 ABI and ISA.         (line 107)
2424 * Import:                                Integer Import and Export.
2425                                                               (line  11)
2426 * In-place operations:                   Efficiency.          (line  57)
2427 * Include files:                         Headers and Libraries.
2428                                                               (line   6)
2429 * info-lookup-symbol:                    Emacs.               (line   6)
2430 * Initialization functions <1>:          Initializing Integers.
2431                                                               (line   6)
2432 * Initialization functions <2>:          Initializing Rationals.
2433                                                               (line   6)
2434 * Initialization functions <3>:          Random State Initialization.
2435                                                               (line   6)
2436 * Initialization functions <4>:          Simultaneous Float Init & Assign.
2437                                                               (line   6)
2438 * Initialization functions <5>:          Simultaneous Integer Init & Assign.
2439                                                               (line   6)
2440 * Initialization functions:              Initializing Floats. (line   6)
2441 * Initializing and clearing:             Efficiency.          (line  21)
2442 * Input functions <1>:                   I/O of Integers.     (line   6)
2443 * Input functions <2>:                   I/O of Rationals.    (line   6)
2444 * Input functions <3>:                   I/O of Floats.       (line   6)
2445 * Input functions:                       Formatted Input Functions.
2446                                                               (line   6)
2447 * Install prefix:                        Build Options.       (line  32)
2448 * Installing GMP:                        Installing GMP.      (line   6)
2449 * Instruction Set Architecture:          ABI and ISA.         (line   6)
2450 * instrument-functions:                  Profiling.           (line  66)
2451 * Integer:                               Nomenclature and Types.
2452                                                               (line   6)
2453 * Integer arithmetic functions:          Integer Arithmetic.  (line   6)
2454 * Integer assignment functions <1>:      Simultaneous Integer Init & Assign.
2455                                                               (line   6)
2456 * Integer assignment functions:          Assigning Integers.  (line   6)
2457 * Integer bit manipulation functions:    Integer Logic and Bit Fiddling.
2458                                                               (line   6)
2459 * Integer comparison functions:          Integer Comparisons. (line   6)
2460 * Integer conversion functions:          Converting Integers. (line   6)
2461 * Integer division functions:            Integer Division.    (line   6)
2462 * Integer exponentiation functions:      Integer Exponentiation.
2463                                                               (line   6)
2464 * Integer export:                        Integer Import and Export.
2465                                                               (line  45)
2466 * Integer functions:                     Integer Functions.   (line   6)
2467 * Integer import:                        Integer Import and Export.
2468                                                               (line  11)
2469 * Integer initialization functions <1>:  Simultaneous Integer Init & Assign.
2470                                                               (line   6)
2471 * Integer initialization functions:      Initializing Integers.
2472                                                               (line   6)
2473 * Integer input and output functions:    I/O of Integers.     (line   6)
2474 * Integer internals:                     Integer Internals.   (line   6)
2475 * Integer logical functions:             Integer Logic and Bit Fiddling.
2476                                                               (line   6)
2477 * Integer miscellaneous functions:       Miscellaneous Integer Functions.
2478                                                               (line   6)
2479 * Integer random number functions:       Integer Random Numbers.
2480                                                               (line   6)
2481 * Integer root functions:                Integer Roots.       (line   6)
2482 * Integer sign tests:                    Integer Comparisons. (line  28)
2483 * Integer special functions:             Integer Special Functions.
2484                                                               (line   6)
2485 * Interix:                               Notes for Particular Systems.
2486                                                               (line  51)
2487 * Internals:                             Internals.           (line   6)
2488 * Introduction:                          Introduction to GMP. (line   6)
2489 * Inverse modulo functions:              Number Theoretic Functions.
2490                                                               (line  60)
2491 * IRIX <1>:                              Known Build Problems.
2492                                                               (line  38)
2493 * IRIX:                                  ABI and ISA.         (line 132)
2494 * ISA:                                   ABI and ISA.         (line   6)
2495 * istream input:                         C++ Formatted Input. (line   6)
2496 * Jacobi symbol algorithm:               Jacobi Symbol.       (line   6)
2497 * Jacobi symbol functions:               Number Theoretic Functions.
2498                                                               (line  66)
2499 * Karatsuba multiplication:              Karatsuba Multiplication.
2500                                                               (line   6)
2501 * Karatsuba square root algorithm:       Square Root Algorithm.
2502                                                               (line   6)
2503 * Kronecker symbol functions:            Number Theoretic Functions.
2504                                                               (line  78)
2505 * Language bindings:                     Language Bindings.   (line   6)
2506 * Latest version of GMP:                 Introduction to GMP. (line  38)
2507 * LCM functions:                         Number Theoretic Functions.
2508                                                               (line  55)
2509 * Least common multiple functions:       Number Theoretic Functions.
2510                                                               (line  55)
2511 * Legendre symbol functions:             Number Theoretic Functions.
2512                                                               (line  69)
2513 * libgmp:                                Headers and Libraries.
2514                                                               (line  22)
2515 * libgmpxx:                              Headers and Libraries.
2516                                                               (line  27)
2517 * Libraries:                             Headers and Libraries.
2518                                                               (line  22)
2519 * Libtool:                               Headers and Libraries.
2520                                                               (line  33)
2521 * Libtool versioning:                    Notes for Package Builds.
2522                                                               (line   9)
2523 * License conditions:                    Copying.             (line   6)
2524 * Limb:                                  Nomenclature and Types.
2525                                                               (line  31)
2526 * Limb size:                             Useful Macros and Constants.
2527                                                               (line   7)
2528 * Linear congruential algorithm:         Random Number Algorithms.
2529                                                               (line  25)
2530 * Linear congruential random numbers:    Random State Initialization.
2531                                                               (line  32)
2532 * Linking:                               Headers and Libraries.
2533                                                               (line  22)
2534 * Logical functions:                     Integer Logic and Bit Fiddling.
2535                                                               (line   6)
2536 * Low-level functions:                   Low-level Functions. (line   6)
2537 * Lucas number algorithm:                Lucas Numbers Algorithm.
2538                                                               (line   6)
2539 * Lucas number functions:                Number Theoretic Functions.
2540                                                               (line 119)
2541 * MacOS X:                               Known Build Problems.
2542                                                               (line  51)
2543 * Mailing lists:                         Introduction to GMP. (line  45)
2544 * Malloc debugger:                       Debugging.           (line  30)
2545 * Malloc problems:                       Debugging.           (line  24)
2546 * Memory allocation:                     Custom Allocation.   (line   6)
2547 * Memory management:                     Memory Management.   (line   6)
2548 * Mersenne twister algorithm:            Random Number Algorithms.
2549                                                               (line  17)
2550 * Mersenne twister random numbers:       Random State Initialization.
2551                                                               (line  13)
2552 * MINGW:                                 Notes for Particular Systems.
2553                                                               (line  43)
2554 * MIPS:                                  ABI and ISA.         (line 132)
2555 * Miscellaneous float functions:         Miscellaneous Float Functions.
2556                                                               (line   6)
2557 * Miscellaneous integer functions:       Miscellaneous Integer Functions.
2558                                                               (line   6)
2559 * MMX:                                   Notes for Particular Systems.
2560                                                               (line 132)
2561 * Modular inverse functions:             Number Theoretic Functions.
2562                                                               (line  60)
2563 * Most significant bit:                  Miscellaneous Integer Functions.
2564                                                               (line  34)
2565 * mp.h:                                  BSD Compatible Functions.
2566                                                               (line  21)
2567 * MPN_PATH:                              Build Options.       (line 335)
2568 * MS Windows:                            Notes for Particular Systems.
2569                                                               (line  56)
2570 * MS-DOS:                                Notes for Particular Systems.
2571                                                               (line  43)
2572 * Multi-threading:                       Reentrancy.          (line   6)
2573 * Multiplication algorithms:             Multiplication Algorithms.
2574                                                               (line   6)
2575 * Nails:                                 Low-level Functions. (line 478)
2576 * Native compilation:                    Build Options.       (line  52)
2577 * NeXT:                                  Known Build Problems.
2578                                                               (line  57)
2579 * Next prime function:                   Number Theoretic Functions.
2580                                                               (line  23)
2581 * Nomenclature:                          Nomenclature and Types.
2582                                                               (line   6)
2583 * Non-Unix systems:                      Build Options.       (line  11)
2584 * Nth root algorithm:                    Nth Root Algorithm.  (line   6)
2585 * Number sequences:                      Efficiency.          (line 147)
2586 * Number theoretic functions:            Number Theoretic Functions.
2587                                                               (line   6)
2588 * Numerator and denominator:             Applying Integer Functions.
2589                                                               (line   6)
2590 * obstack output:                        Formatted Output Functions.
2591                                                               (line  81)
2592 * OpenBSD:                               Notes for Particular Systems.
2593                                                               (line  86)
2594 * Optimizing performance:                Performance optimization.
2595                                                               (line   6)
2596 * ostream output:                        C++ Formatted Output.
2597                                                               (line   6)
2598 * Other languages:                       Language Bindings.   (line   6)
2599 * Output functions <1>:                  I/O of Floats.       (line   6)
2600 * Output functions <2>:                  I/O of Rationals.    (line   6)
2601 * Output functions <3>:                  Formatted Output Functions.
2602                                                               (line   6)
2603 * Output functions:                      I/O of Integers.     (line   6)
2604 * Packaged builds:                       Notes for Package Builds.
2605                                                               (line   6)
2606 * Parameter conventions:                 Parameter Conventions.
2607                                                               (line   6)
2608 * Parsing expressions demo:              Demonstration Programs.
2609                                                               (line  21)
2610 * Particular systems:                    Notes for Particular Systems.
2611                                                               (line   6)
2612 * Past GMP versions:                     Compatibility with older versions.
2613                                                               (line   6)
2614 * PDF:                                   Build Options.       (line 350)
2615 * Perfect power algorithm:               Perfect Power Algorithm.
2616                                                               (line   6)
2617 * Perfect power functions:               Integer Roots.       (line  27)
2618 * Perfect square algorithm:              Perfect Square Algorithm.
2619                                                               (line   6)
2620 * Perfect square functions:              Integer Roots.       (line  36)
2621 * perl:                                  Demonstration Programs.
2622                                                               (line  35)
2623 * Perl module:                           Demonstration Programs.
2624                                                               (line  35)
2625 * Postscript:                            Build Options.       (line 350)
2626 * Power/PowerPC <1>:                     Known Build Problems.
2627                                                               (line  63)
2628 * Power/PowerPC:                         Notes for Particular Systems.
2629                                                               (line  92)
2630 * Powering algorithms:                   Powering Algorithms. (line   6)
2631 * Powering functions <1>:                Float Arithmetic.    (line  41)
2632 * Powering functions:                    Integer Exponentiation.
2633                                                               (line   6)
2634 * PowerPC:                               ABI and ISA.         (line 167)
2635 * Precision of floats:                   Floating-point Functions.
2636                                                               (line   6)
2637 * Precision of hardware floating point:  Notes for Particular Systems.
2638                                                               (line  34)
2639 * Prefix:                                Build Options.       (line  32)
2640 * Prime testing algorithms:              Prime Testing Algorithm.
2641                                                               (line   6)
2642 * Prime testing functions:               Number Theoretic Functions.
2643                                                               (line   7)
2644 * printf formatted output:               Formatted Output.    (line   6)
2645 * Probable prime testing functions:      Number Theoretic Functions.
2646                                                               (line   7)
2647 * prof:                                  Profiling.           (line  24)
2648 * Profiling:                             Profiling.           (line   6)
2649 * Radix conversion algorithms:           Radix Conversion Algorithms.
2650                                                               (line   6)
2651 * Random number algorithms:              Random Number Algorithms.
2652                                                               (line   6)
2653 * Random number functions <1>:           Integer Random Numbers.
2654                                                               (line   6)
2655 * Random number functions <2>:           Miscellaneous Float Functions.
2656                                                               (line  27)
2657 * Random number functions:               Random Number Functions.
2658                                                               (line   6)
2659 * Random number seeding:                 Random State Seeding.
2660                                                               (line   6)
2661 * Random number state:                   Random State Initialization.
2662                                                               (line   6)
2663 * Random state:                          Nomenclature and Types.
2664                                                               (line  46)
2665 * Rational arithmetic:                   Efficiency.          (line 113)
2666 * Rational arithmetic functions:         Rational Arithmetic. (line   6)
2667 * Rational assignment functions:         Initializing Rationals.
2668                                                               (line   6)
2669 * Rational comparison functions:         Comparing Rationals. (line   6)
2670 * Rational conversion functions:         Rational Conversions.
2671                                                               (line   6)
2672 * Rational initialization functions:     Initializing Rationals.
2673                                                               (line   6)
2674 * Rational input and output functions:   I/O of Rationals.    (line   6)
2675 * Rational internals:                    Rational Internals.  (line   6)
2676 * Rational number:                       Nomenclature and Types.
2677                                                               (line  16)
2678 * Rational number functions:             Rational Number Functions.
2679                                                               (line   6)
2680 * Rational numerator and denominator:    Applying Integer Functions.
2681                                                               (line   6)
2682 * Rational sign tests:                   Comparing Rationals. (line  27)
2683 * Raw output internals:                  Raw Output Internals.
2684                                                               (line   6)
2685 * Reallocations:                         Efficiency.          (line  30)
2686 * Reentrancy:                            Reentrancy.          (line   6)
2687 * References:                            References.          (line   6)
2688 * Remove factor functions:               Number Theoretic Functions.
2689                                                               (line  90)
2690 * Reporting bugs:                        Reporting Bugs.      (line   6)
2691 * Root extraction algorithm:             Nth Root Algorithm.  (line   6)
2692 * Root extraction algorithms:            Root Extraction Algorithms.
2693                                                               (line   6)
2694 * Root extraction functions <1>:         Float Arithmetic.    (line  37)
2695 * Root extraction functions:             Integer Roots.       (line   6)
2696 * Root testing functions:                Integer Roots.       (line  36)
2697 * Rounding functions:                    Miscellaneous Float Functions.
2698                                                               (line   9)
2699 * Sample programs:                       Demonstration Programs.
2700                                                               (line   6)
2701 * Scan bit functions:                    Integer Logic and Bit Fiddling.
2702                                                               (line  38)
2703 * scanf formatted input:                 Formatted Input.     (line   6)
2704 * SCO:                                   Known Build Problems.
2705                                                               (line  38)
2706 * Seeding random numbers:                Random State Seeding.
2707                                                               (line   6)
2708 * Segmentation violation:                Debugging.           (line   7)
2709 * Sequent Symmetry:                      Known Build Problems.
2710                                                               (line  68)
2711 * Services for Unix:                     Notes for Particular Systems.
2712                                                               (line  51)
2713 * Shared library versioning:             Notes for Package Builds.
2714                                                               (line   9)
2715 * Sign tests <1>:                        Float Comparison.    (line  33)
2716 * Sign tests <2>:                        Integer Comparisons. (line  28)
2717 * Sign tests:                            Comparing Rationals. (line  27)
2718 * Size in digits:                        Miscellaneous Integer Functions.
2719                                                               (line  23)
2720 * Small operands:                        Efficiency.          (line   7)
2721 * Solaris <1>:                           ABI and ISA.         (line 201)
2722 * Solaris:                               Known Build Problems.
2723                                                               (line  78)
2724 * Sparc:                                 Notes for Particular Systems.
2725                                                               (line 108)
2726 * Sparc V9:                              ABI and ISA.         (line 201)
2727 * Special integer functions:             Integer Special Functions.
2728                                                               (line   6)
2729 * Square root algorithm:                 Square Root Algorithm.
2730                                                               (line   6)
2731 * SSE2:                                  Notes for Particular Systems.
2732                                                               (line 132)
2733 * Stack backtrace:                       Debugging.           (line  50)
2734 * Stack overflow <1>:                    Debugging.           (line   7)
2735 * Stack overflow:                        Build Options.       (line 278)
2736 * Static linking:                        Efficiency.          (line  14)
2737 * stdarg.h:                              Headers and Libraries.
2738                                                               (line  17)
2739 * stdio.h:                               Headers and Libraries.
2740                                                               (line  11)
2741 * Stripped libraries:                    Known Build Problems.
2742                                                               (line  28)
2743 * Sun:                                   ABI and ISA.         (line 201)
2744 * SunOS:                                 Notes for Particular Systems.
2745                                                               (line 120)
2746 * Systems:                               Notes for Particular Systems.
2747                                                               (line   6)
2748 * Temporary memory:                      Build Options.       (line 278)
2749 * Texinfo:                               Build Options.       (line 347)
2750 * Text input/output:                     Efficiency.          (line 153)
2751 * Thread safety:                         Reentrancy.          (line   6)
2752 * Toom multiplication <1>:               Other Multiplication.
2753                                                               (line   6)
2754 * Toom multiplication <2>:               Toom 4-Way Multiplication.
2755                                                               (line   6)
2756 * Toom multiplication:                   Toom 3-Way Multiplication.
2757                                                               (line   6)
2758 * Types:                                 Nomenclature and Types.
2759                                                               (line   6)
2760 * ui and si functions:                   Efficiency.          (line  50)
2761 * Unbalanced multiplication:             Unbalanced Multiplication.
2762                                                               (line   6)
2763 * Upward compatibility:                  Compatibility with older versions.
2764                                                               (line   6)
2765 * Useful macros and constants:           Useful Macros and Constants.
2766                                                               (line   6)
2767 * User-defined precision:                Floating-point Functions.
2768                                                               (line   6)
2769 * Valgrind:                              Debugging.           (line 130)
2770 * Variable conventions:                  Variable Conventions.
2771                                                               (line   6)
2772 * Version number:                        Useful Macros and Constants.
2773                                                               (line  12)
2774 * Web page:                              Introduction to GMP. (line  34)
2775 * Windows:                               Notes for Particular Systems.
2776                                                               (line  56)
2777 * x86:                                   Notes for Particular Systems.
2778                                                               (line 126)
2779 * x87:                                   Notes for Particular Systems.
2780                                                               (line  34)
2781 * XML:                                   Build Options.       (line 354)
2782
2783 \1f
2784 File: gmp.info,  Node: Function Index,  Prev: Concept Index,  Up: Top
2785
2786 Function and Type Index
2787 ***********************
2788
2789 \0\b[index\0\b]
2790 * Menu:
2791
2792 * __GMP_CC:                              Useful Macros and Constants.
2793                                                               (line  23)
2794 * __GMP_CFLAGS:                          Useful Macros and Constants.
2795                                                               (line  24)
2796 * __GNU_MP_VERSION:                      Useful Macros and Constants.
2797                                                               (line  10)
2798 * __GNU_MP_VERSION_MINOR:                Useful Macros and Constants.
2799                                                               (line  11)
2800 * __GNU_MP_VERSION_PATCHLEVEL:           Useful Macros and Constants.
2801                                            &n